Reconstructing Criminal Law: Text and Materials

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Cambridge University Press, Sep 1, 2003 - Law - 912 pages
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Reconstructing Criminal Law provides a radical and stimulating alternative to the standard black letter criminal law text. The authors analyse central aspects of criminal law in the context of the assumptions surrounding it, and employ a number of critical approaches, including a feminist perspective to give insights into the current state of the law. A comprehensive resource - it contains extracts that cover a wide range of materials from historical, political, sociological and philosophical sources and discusses offences considered to be at the margins of criminal law. It also offers an important practical element whereby students and teachers can attempt to answer the questions that the criminal justice system confronts on a daily basis.
 

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Contents

Approaching criminal law
1
Criminal laws in their social and procedural context
70
Law and order
111
I1 Public order laws
136
Chapter3 Risk and danger
216
legal constructions of a social problem
271
Property and propriety
310
Constructing property in criminal law
350
Sexual violence
473
Regulating sexuality
516
Regulating maternity
579
conceptions of violence
625
The criminal regulation of public safety
637
b Characteristics of regulatory offences
645
Bibliography
805
Index
847

Property rights and criminal enforcement
424
trust
454

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About the author (2003)

Nicola Lacey is Professor of Criminal Law and Legal Theory at the London School of Economics and Political Science and an Adjunct Professor at the Research School of Social Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra.

Oliver Quick is a Senior Lecturer in Law at the School of Law, University of Bristol, where he teaches undergraduate and postgraduate courses in criminal law, criminal justice, medical law and public health law.

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