Reconstruction in Philosophy

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Cosimo, Inc., Oct 1, 2008 - Philosophy - 236 pages
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Though best remembered today as a philosopher of early-childhood education through his influential 1899 work The School and Society and the essay The Child and the Curriculum, John Dewey also expended considerable thought on the progress of philosophy itself. In this striking book, first published just after the First World War in 1920, Dewey considers how, why, and when human affairs should prompt a new approach to concepts of morality and justice. How should the revelations of science in the 20th century, and its consequential technology, impact human thought? Is seeing knowledge as power philosophical supportable and desirable? Must we redefine what it means to be idealist? Where do politics and philosophy intersect? Deweys bracing explorations of these questions, and others, continue to enthrall thinking people and continue to be vitally relevantnearly a century after they were written. American educator and philosopher JOHN DEWEY (18591952) helped found the American Association of University Professors. He served as professor of philosophy at Columbia University from 1904 to 1930 and authored numerous books, including Experience and Nature (1925), Experience and Education (1938), and Freedom and Culture (1939).
 

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Contents

I
1
II
28
III
53
IV
77
V
103
VI
132
VII
161
VIII
187
IX
215
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About the author (2008)

John Dewey was born in 1859 in Burlington, Vermont. He founded the Laboratory School at the University of Chicago in 1896 to apply his original theories of learning based on pragmatism and "directed living." This combination of learning with concrete activities and practical experience helped earn him the title, "father of progressive education." After leaving Chicago he went to Columbia University as a professor of philosophy from 1904 to 1930, bringing his educational philosophy to the Teachers College there. Dewey was known and consulted internationally for his opinions on a wide variety of social, educational and political issues. His many books on these topics began with Psychology (1887), and include The School and Society (1899), Experience and Nature (1925), and Freedom and Culture (1939).Dewey died of pneumonia in 1952.

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