Recording Oral History: A Guide for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Front Cover
Rowman Altamira, 2005 - History - 398 pages
1 Review
A newer edition of this book is available for ordering at the following web address: https: //rowman.com/ISBN/9780759122680 In this second editon of Recording Oral History, Valerie Raleigh Yow builds on the foundation of her classic text. One of the most widely used and highly regarded textbooks ever published in the field, Yow's updated edition now includes new material on using the internet, an examination of the interactions between oral history and memory processes, and analysis of testimony and the interpretation of meanings in different contexts. Written in a clear, accessible style, this new volume offers historians, social scientists and other practitioners engaged in this difficult, rewarding work a scholarly and practical guide to the methods of oral history. It will interest researchers and students in a wide variety of disciplines including history, sociology, anthropology, education, psychology, social work and ethnographic methods.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

azgar ali

Contents

Introduction to the InDepth Interview
1
Brief History of the Use of Oral History
2
Definition of Oral History
3
Still a New Kid on the Block
4
Comparisons
5
The InDepth Interview as a Qualitative Research Method
8
Uses of the Recorded InDepth Interview
9
The Use of Narrative as a Research Strategy
14
Composing the Interview Guide
195
Choice of Narrators
198
Involving the Community
199
Special Research Situations
200
Commissioned Research
204
Presentation of Findings
206
Looking Deeply and Critically at Your Collection of Oral Histories of a Community
208
The Importance of Place
210

Limitations of the Recorded Life Review
17
Special Strengths of Oral History
21
Summary
23
Notes
30
Oral History and Memory
35
MemoryFallible or Trustworthy?
36
Psychologists General Findings about How Memory Works
37
Aging and Memory
38
Research Methods Concerning Individual Memory
39
Consistency of Factual Content of LongHeld Memories
40
Recall of Daily Habitual Events versus the Single Episode
41
Consistency in Memories of Feelings
43
Consistency in Memories of Meanings
44
Moods Emotional Needs and Recall
45
Physical Sensation a Spur to Remembering
47
Vivid Images Recall and False Memory
48
Remembering the Time
49
Differences in the Way Men and Women Remember
50
Effects of the InterviewerNarrator Relationship on Remembering
51
Individual Memory and Collective Memory
52
Official Memory and Popular Memory
54
Power of the Media to Create Popular Memory
55
Conclusion
57
Recommended Reading
58
Notes
62
Preparation for the Interviewing Project
68
Conceptualization of the Research Project
69
Composing the Interview Guide
71
Strategies for Questioning
74
Kinds of Words and Phrasing to Avoid
79
Selecting Narrators
80
Contacting Narrators
83
Scheduling the Interview
84
Summary
87
Recommended Reading
88
Notes
90
Interviewing Techniques
92
Beginning the Interview
95
Building Rapport
96
Diminishing Rapport
100
Using Skill in Questioning
102
Coping with Troublesome Situations
108
Ending the Interview
114
Summary
116
Recommended Reading
117
Notes
118
Legalities and Ethics
121
Ethical Issues
129
Conclusion
148
Recommended Reading
149
Notes
152
Interpersonal Relations in the Interview
157
Effects of the Interview on the Narrator
158
Effects of the Interview on the Interviewer
162
Effects of Race Gender Age Class Ethnicity and Subculture
169
Effects of the Interview on People Close to the Narrator
178
Recommended Reading
179
Notes
183
Varieties of Oral History Projects Community Studies
188
Tensions in Community Studies
190
Informational Interviews
194
Notes
216
Varieties of Oral History Projects Biography
220
Literature or History?
221
Why Research and Write Biography?
222
Difference between Life History Life Story Autobiography and Biography
225
Why Tell This Life Story?
226
Setting Up Interviews Involving the Narrator
227
Effect of the Narrators Agendas and Psychology on the Interview
228
Effect of the Interviewers Agenda on the Interview
230
The Effect of Gender on Questions and Interpretations
233
Interviewing Friends Enemies and Even the Onlookers
236
The Wider World in the Interview Guide for Biography
237
Placing the Subject in the Context of Gender Race Class and Culture
238
Possible Ethical Implications in Biographical Research
239
Legal Issues Specific to Biography
241
Topics and Questions to Be Included in an Interview Guide
243
Recommended Reading
244
Notes
248
Varieties of Oral History Projects Family Research
253
Finding Families for Social Science Research
255
Introduction of the Project to the Family
256
Inspiring Narrators Interest in Participating in the Research
257
Research Strategies with Husband and Wife
259
Interviewing Techniques with Family Members
261
Use of Artifacts and Photographs in Interviewing
264
Family Folklore
266
Confronting Differences in Interpretation with the Narrator
268
Suggested Questions to Ask in Family History Research
269
Evaluation of Family Members Oral Histories
272
Advantages of Studying Family History
273
Summary
274
Notes
279
Analysis and Interpretation
282
A Close Look at an Individual Oral History
286
Reflections on This Interview
299
Recommended Reading
307
Notes
309
Conclusion of the Project
311
Face Sheet and Information Sheet
313
Transcription
315
Return of the Transcript to the Narrator
322
Publication of Oral Histories
325
Citation of Oral History Interviews
328
Sharing Information
330
Recommended Reading
332
Notes
333
Sample Interview Guide
335
The Oral History Associations Oral History Evaluation Guidelines
342
Principles and Standards of the Oral History Association
353
Oral History Excluded from Institutional Review Board 1RB Review
358
Model RecordKeeping Sheets
361
Legal Release Forms
364
Sample Face Sheet and Information Sheet
372
Sample Tape Index
375
Sample First Page of a Tape Collections Master Index
377
Instructions for Indexing a Transcript Using a Computer
379
Citing the Oral Histories
380
Author Index
382
Subject Index
391
About the Author
397
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (2005)

Valerie Raleigh Yow received her M.A. and Ph.D. in history from the University of Wisconsin, and is the book review editor for the Oral History Review. She has been Associate Director of the State Oral History Project in Rhode island, a member of the history department at the University of Rhode island, and a faculty member at Northern Illinois University, DeKalb. She has served as a consultant on numerous oral history projects and delivered papers at annual conferences of the Oral History Association and the American Association for the History of Medicine. She is an independent scholar living in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, where she researches and writes histories and conducts a private practice in psychotherapy.

Bibliographic information