Records of the Descendants of Hugh Clark: Of Watertown, Mass. 1640-1866

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author, 1866 - 260 pages

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Page 142 - The busy day, the peaceful night, Unfelt, uncounted, glided by; His frame was firm, his powers were bright, Though now his eightieth year was nigh. Then with no fiery throbbing pain, No cold gradations of decay, Death broke at once the vital chain, And freed his soul the nearest way.
Page 143 - ... he began the practice of his profession in Boston. In July 1857, he was appointed one of the district physicians of the Boston Dispensary. He was remarkably successful in his practice ; which increased rapidly, as his father was intending to relinquish the profession to his son. On the breaking out of the war, he was one of the first physicians to enter the service of the Sanitary Commission, and continued in its service until the close of the Peninsula campaign in Virginia. He was subsequently...
Page 210 - Society, and at the time of his death was Chairman of the Board of Mental Health of the State of Connecticut.
Page 28 - For almost, si years the Painful, Laborious and Faithful Pastor of the first Church in this town. He was a Great Divine, well established in the orthodox Doctrines of the Gospel. His writings on many important subjects will Transmit his name with Honour to Posterity. An accomplished Christian : well experiened in all the Graces of the Divine Life. The most exemplary Patience, Humility, and Meekness were illustratively Displayed in his character as a Christian. He was born March 12, 1693. Graduated...
Page 47 - His house was a favorite resort for the patriots of the day. Here, John Hancock, Samuel Adams, and their friends found a safe retreat, where they could in security form those plans which were to save their country, and gain new courage and wisdom from the counsels of their host. At the battle of Lexington, his house was thrown open, and the wounded and dying were placed under the care of his famlly.
Page 28 - June 10 1768 ^tatis 76— Wrapt In his arms who bled on Calvary's Plain, We murmer not Blest Shade, nor dare complain — Fled to those seats where perfect spirits shine, We mourn our lot, yet still rejoice in thine ; Taught by thy tongue, By thy example lead, We Bless'd the living, and revere the Dead.
Page 75 - At the time of her death she was the oldest member of the First Congregational Church.
Page 19 - Saviour Jesus Christ, to have full and free pardon and forgiveness of all my sins and to inherit everlasting life and my Body I commit to the Earth to be decently buried at the discretion of my Executor hereafter named...
Page 17 - He was born, according to his own testimony, about 1613, and the first mention of him, in this country, occurs in the town records of "Watertown, at the time of the birth of his eldest son, John, in 1641. His wife's name was ELIZABETH, and he probably married her before coming to New England. He lived in "Watertown about twenty years, and here his three children were born. In legal documents he is called a " husbandman," and there is no evidence that he ever held any important offices, although his...
Page 135 - ... a member of the Massachusetts Historical Society, of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, of the American Antiquarian Society, and — we really do not know what else, though that formidable etc.

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