Recovering Pragmatism's Voice: The Classical Tradition, Rorty, and the Philosophy of Communication

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Lenore Langsdorf, Andrew R. Smith
SUNY Press, 1995 - Philosophy - 336 pages
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This book focuses on what pragmatism tells us about the nature and function of communication. Its goals are to recover a singular voice of pragmatism, and to identify and develop alternative methods and aims for the philosophy of communication. It shows how pragmatism assumes and proposes a philosophy of communication that can lead to a reconceptualization of contemporary communication studies.

The authors explore recurrent themes in the tradition’s various classical extensions that commend pragmatism as a methodology for social change and human development. They show that pragmatism fosters inquiry and pluralism by rejecting strategies for closure, questioning prevailing metanarratives, and encouraging the development of new habits of conduct through a critical practice that is fundamentally self-reflective.
 

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Contents

The Voice of Pragmatism in Contemporary Philosophy of Communication
1
Immediacy Opposition and Mediation Peirce on Irreducible Aspects of the Communicative Process
23
From Enthymeme to Abduction The Classical Law of Logic and the Postmodern Rule of Rhetoric
49
On Ethnocentric Truth and Pragmatic Justice
71
The CashValue of Communication An Interpretation of William James
97
Devising Ends Worth Striving For William James and the Reconstruction of Philosophy
115
John Dewey and the Roots of Democratic Imagination
131
Pragmatism Reconsidered John Dewey and Michel Foucault on the Consequences of Inquiry
155
Philosophy of Language and Philosophy of Communication Poiesis and Praxis in Classical Pragmatism
195
TalkingWith as a Model for WritingAbout Implications of Rortyean Pragmatism
211
Changing the Subject Rorty and Contemporary Rhetorical Theory
235
Icons Fragments and Ironists Richard Rorty and Contemporary Rhetorical Criticism
251
Notes
271
Contributors
329
Name Index
333
Subject Index
335

George Herbert Mead and the Many Voices of Universality
179

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About the author (1995)

Contributors to this volume include Mitchell Aboulafia, Thomas Alexander, Arthur Bochner and Joanne Waugh, Isaac Catt, Vincent Colapietro, Janet Horne, Richard Lanigan, Frank Macke, Mick Presnell, Charlene Haddock Seigfried, and Leonard Shyles.

Lenore Langsdorf is Professor of the Philosophy of Communication in the Speech Communication Department of Southern Illinois University at Carbondale

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