Redburn: Works of Herman Melville Volume Four

Front Cover
Northwestern University Press, 1969 - Fiction - 384 pages
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Redburn is a fictional narrative of a boy's first voyage, based loosely on Melville's own first voyage to and from Liverpool in 1839. Hastily composed and little esteemed by its author, Redburn was more highly thought of by his critics, who saw it regaining the ground of popular sea stories like Typee and Omoo.

Melville so disliked the novel that he submitted it to his publisher without polishing it. This scholarly edition corrects a number of errors that have persisted in subsequent editions. Based on collations of the editions published during his lifetime, it incorporates corrections made in the English edition and emendations made by the present editors.

As with all the books in the Northwestern-Newberry series, this edition of Redburn is an Approved Text of the Center for Editions of American Authors (Modern Language Association of America).
 

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Review: Redburn

User Review  - Sarah - Goodreads

I feel like what I just finished reading could have been told in about half the number of pages and have been done better. There were certain passages and sentences that showed the make of a brilliant writer, but overall it was underwhelming. Read full review

Contents

Redburns Departure from Home
10
He Arrives in Town
14
How He Disposed of His FowlingPiece
19
He Purchases His SeaWardrobe and on a Dismal Rainy Day
23
He Is Initiated in the Business of Cleaning Out the PigPen and
27
He Gets to Sea and Feels Very Bad
32
He Is Put into the Larboard Watch Gets SeaSick and Relates
38
The Sailors Becoming a Little Social Redburn Converses with
45
The Old Church of St Nicholas and the DeadHouse
177
What Redburn Saw in LauncelottsHey
180
The DockWall Beggars
185
The BoobleAlleys of the Town
189
Placards BrassJewelers TruckHorses and Steamers
192
Redburn Roues About Hither and Thither
200
His Adventure with the Cross Old Gentleman
207
He Takes a Delightful Ramble into the Country and Makes
209

He Is Very Much Frightened the Sailors Abuse Him and He
50
He Helps Wash the Decks and Then Goes to Breakfast
53
He Gives Some Account of One of His Shipmates Called
56
He Has a Fine Day at Sea Begins to Like It but Changes His
63
He Contemplates Making a Social Call on the Captain in His
67
The Melancholy State of His Wardrobe
72
At Dead of Night He Is Sent Up to Loose the MainSkysail
77
The Cook and Steward
80
He Endeavors to Improve His Mind and Tells of One Blunt
85
A Narrow Escape
92
In a Fog He Is Set to Work as a BellToller and Beholds a
95
A Whaleman and a ManofWarsMan
99
The Highlander Passes a Wreck
102
An Unaccountable CabinPassenger and a Mysterious Young
106
He Begins to Hop About in the Rigging Like a Saint Jagos
114
QuarterDeck Furniture
118
A Sailor a Jack of All Trades
120
He Gets a Peep at Ireland and at Last Arrives at Liverpool
124
He Goes to Supper at the Sign of the Baltimore Clipper
130
Redburn Deferentially Discourses Concerning the Prospects of
136
Redburn Grows Intolerably Flat and Stupid over Some Out
141
With His Prosy Old GuideBook He Takes a Prosy Stroll
151
The Docks
161
The SaltDroghers and German Emigrant Ships
165
The Irrawaddy
170
Galliots CoastofGuineaMan and Floating Chapel
174
Redburn Introduces Master Harry Bolton to the Favorable
216
Harry Bolton Kidnaps Redburn and Carries Him Off to London
224
A Mysterious Night in London
227
HomewardBound
237
A Living Corpse
243
Carlo
247
Harry Bolton at Sea
252
The Emigrants
259
The Emigrants Kitchen
263
The Horatii and Curiatii
267
Some Superior Old NailRod and PigTail
270
Drawing Nigh to the Last Scene in Jacksons Career
275
Under the Lee of the LongBoat Redburn and Harry Hold
277
Almost a Famine
283
Though the Highlander Puts into No Harbor As Yet She Here
285
The Last End of Jackson
294
Home at Last
298
Redburn and Harry Arm and Arm in Harbor
302
The Last That Was Ever Heard of Harry Bolton
310
EDITORIAL APPENDIX Historical Note By Hershel Parker
313
Note on the Text
353
Discussions of Adopted Readings
367
List of Emendations
371
Report of LineEnd Hyphenation
375
List of Substantive Variants
381
Copyright

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About the author (1969)

Herman Melville (August 1, 1819 – September 28, 1891) was an American novelist, short story writer, essayist, and poet. He is best known for his novel Moby-Dick. His first three books gained much contemporary attention (the first, Typee, becoming a bestseller), and after a fast-blooming literary success in the late 1840s, his popularity declined precipitously in the mid-1850s and never recovered during his lifetime. When he died in 1891, he was almost completely forgotten. It was not until the "Melville Revival" in the early 20th century that his work won recognition, especially Moby-Dick, which was hailed as one of the literary masterpieces of both American and world literature. He was the first writer to have his works collected and published by the Library of America.