Redesigning Achilles: 'Recycling' the Epic Cycle in the 'Little Iliad' (Ovid, Metamorphoses 12.1-13.622)

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Walter de Gruyter, Jan 1, 2007 - Literary Criticism - 316 pages
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The book is a detailed study on the structure and the topics of Ovid’s compedium of the Trojan Saga in Metamorphoses 12.1-13.622, the section also referred to as the “Little Iliad”. It explores the motives and the objectives behind the selected narrative moments from the Epic Cycle that found their way into the Ovidian version of the Trojan War. By thoroughly mastering and inspiringly refashioning a vast amount of literary material, Ovid generates a systematic reconstruction of the archetypal hero, Achilles. Thus, he projects himself as a worthy successor of Homer in the epic tradition, a master epicist, and a par to his great Latin predecessor, Vergil.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Chapter One Designing Epic Beginnings
25
Introducing Achilles Met 1264145
49
Deconstructing Achilles
87
Killing Achilles
125
ReConstructing Achilles
153
Performing the Poetics of Genre and GenderCrossing in the Fall of Troy Met 13399575
207
Impersonating Achilles
253
Backmatter
285
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About the author (2007)

Sophia Papaioannou, The National and Capodistrian University of Athens, Greece.

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