Reeves' History of the English Law, from the Time of the Romans to the End of the Reign of Elizabeth [1603]: With Numerous Notes, and an Introductory Dissertation on the Nature and Use of Legal History, the Rise and Progress of Our Laws, and the Influence of the Roman Law in the Formation of Our Own, Volume 4

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M. Murphy, 1879 - Law
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Page 442 - ... or they by whom he or they claim the same, have been in possession of the same, or of the reversion or remainder thereof, or taken the rents or profits thereof, by the space of one whole year next before the said bargain, covenant, grant or promise made...
Page 485 - Thus, where land was leased to A. for a year, and so from year to year...
Page 206 - First, the king our said sovereign lord remembereth, how 3 int. 164. by unlawful maintenances, giving of liveries, signs, and tokens, and retainders by indentures, promises, oaths, writings, or otherwise embraceries of his subjects, untrue demeanings of sheriffs in making of panels, and other untrue returns, by taking of money, by juries, by great riots, and unlawful assemblies, the policy and good rule of this realm is almost subdued...
Page 464 - By the permission and ordinance of God we are king of England, and the kings of England in times past never had any superior, but God only. Therefore know you well that we will maintain the right of our crown, and of our temporal jurisdiction, as well in this, as in all other points, in as ample manner as any of our progenitors have done before our time.
Page 428 - JAMES, by the grace of God, king of England, France, and Ireland, defender of the faith; and of Scotland the seven and fortieth.
Page 206 - ... in case of extremity, by the conscience of a good man ; there was nevertheless always reserved a high and pre-eminent power to the king's council in causes that might in example or consequence concern the state of the commonwealth ; which if they were criminal, the council used to sit in the chamber called the star chamber ; if civil, in the white chamber or white hall. And as the chancery had the pretorian power for equity, so the star chamber had the censorian power for offences under the degree...
Page 371 - ... and many other inconveniences have happened, and daily do increase among the king's subjects, to their great trouble and inquietness, and to the utter subversion of the ancient common law of this realm ; for the extirpating and extinguishment of all such subtle practised feoffments, fines, recoveries, abuses and errors...
Page 422 - ... wish, will, or desire, by words or writing, or by craft imagine, invent, practise, or attempt any bodily harm to be done or committed to the king's most royal person, the queen's, or their heirs apparent, or...
Page 369 - Where by the common laws of this realm, lands, tenements, and hereditaments be not devisable by testament, nor ought to be transferred from one to another, but by solemn livery and seisin, matter of record ', writing sufficient made bona fide...
Page 436 - Administrator, and convicted thereof, in such Case the Property shall be restored to the Owner or his Representative ; and...

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