Reflections From the Wrong Side of the Tracks: Class, Identity, and the Working Class Experience in Academe

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Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Nov 28, 2005 - Social Science - 256 pages
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In this edited collection of narrative-based, critically situated essays, each contributor explores how class has affected his/her personal and academic lives. The collection is divided into three sections: i) narratives that critique the meritocracy; ii) narratives that trace the effects of middle class cultural capital on relatively new academics from the working class, and; iii) narratives that explore the effects of class on longtime academics from the working class. The effect of the collection will be cumulative. By choosing contributors from multiple disciplines, including both established and emerging voices, the text articulates the pervasiveness of class bias in this country and fleshes out the mechanisms that mask how class and power work. Such a text is critically important, both inside and outside academia, because it demystifies the academic world for those who have been restricted by it, but also engages critically trained academics and academics-in-waiting to understand and respond to the experiences of working class students. Finally, the authors hope this text will encourage other working class students to consider an academic career as an option.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Slippin through the Cracks WorkingClass Academics Challenge the Meritocracy
7
Attacked from Within and Without WorkingClass Academics and Initial Confrontations with Academe
81
Stoking the Fires of Resistance Longtime WorkingClass Academics Speak
171
Index
261
About the Contributors
273
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Stephen L. Muzzatti is Assistant Professor of sociology at Ryerson University, Toronto. C. Vincent Samarco is Associate Professor of American literature and creative writing at Saginaw Valley State University. He also teaches creative writing at the Saginaw Correctional Facility.

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