Reflections on death: a sermon on occasion of the death of the Rev. Robert Robinson, of Cambridge, delivered at the new meeting in Birmingham, June 13, 1790, and published at the request of those who heard it, and of Mr. Robinson's family

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Printed by J. Belcher, and sold by J. Johnson, 1790 - Clergy - 26 pages
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Page 3 - But and if that evil servant shall say in his heart, My lord delayeth his coming; and shall begin to smite his fellowservants, and to eat and drink with the drunken ; the lord of that servant shall come in a day when he looketh not for him, and in an hour that he is not aware of, and shall cut him asunder, and appoint him his portion with the hypocrites: there shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth.
Page 17 - The change of our condition by death, says this, author, may not be so great as we are apt to imagine. . As our natures will not be changed, but only improved, we have no reason to think that the future -world (which will be adapted to our merely improved nature) will be materially different from this. And indeed why should we ask, or expect any thing more ? If we should still be obliged to provide for our subsistence by exercise, or...
Page 17 - ... becoming rational beings, and who have never been able to bear the languor of absolute rest, or indolence ? Our future happiness has, with much reason, been supposed to arise from an increase of knowledge. But if we should have nothing more than the means of knowledge furnished us, as we have here, but be left to our own labour to find it out; is that to be complained of by those who will have acquired a love of truth, and a habit of inquiring after it...
Page 18 - To make discoveries ourselves, though the search may require time and labour, is unspeakably more pleasing than to learn every thing by the information of others. If the immortality that is promised to us in the Gospel, should not be necessary, and absolute, and we should only have the certain -means of making ourselves immortal, we should have much to be thankful for. What the Scriptures inform us concerning a future life, is expressed in general terms, and often in figurative language.
Page 23 - Robinson's exemplary conduct in the education that he gave to his numerous family, notonly in religion, but in all branches of useful knowledge ; by no means neglecting his daughters.
Page 24 - ... as those of men, and it is of importance that when they have leisure, they should have the same resource in reading, and the same power of instructing the world, by writing, that men have, and that if they be mothers, they be capable of assisting in the instruction of their children, to which they have generally more opportunity to attend, than the fathers.
Page 23 - Certainly, the minds of women are capable of the same improvement and the same furniture as those of men ; and it is of importance that, when they have leisure, they should have the same resource in reading, and the same power of instructing the world by writing, that men have ; and that, if they be mothers, they be capable of assisting in the instruction of their children ; to which they have generally more opportunity to attend than the fathersIn all labors proper for his station, and for the public,...
Page 23 - ... by others in mathematics and philofophy. Certainly, the minds of women are capable of the fame improvement, and the fame furniture, as thofe of men; and it is of importance that, when they have leifure, they...
Page 18 - What the fcriptures inform us concerning a future life is expreiTed in general terms, and often in figurative language. A more particular knowledge of it is wifely concealed from us.
Page 20 - When he was in his prime, he used, without any art, or ostentation of oratory, perfectly to command the attention of his audience; and, always speaking extempore, he would vary his style and address according to his hearers, in a manner that was truly wonderful. His writings discover equal powers of imagination, and of judgment. His sermons, preached in the villages near Cambridge, are remarkable for their plainness and their propriety. But at the time they were composed, he had not acquired all...

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