Reflections Upon Learning, Wherein is Shown the Insufficiency Thereof, in Its Several Particulars: In Order to Evince the Usefulness and Necessity of Revelation

Front Cover
J. Knapton and R. Wilkin, 1714 - Knowledge, Theory of - 298 pages
1 Review
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

OCLC: 220659264
LCSHs:Learning and scholarship --Early works to 1800.
Knowledge, Theory of (Religion)
Revelation.
LCCN:AZ 

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 127 - Quakers underjlood their own Notion, and knew how to explain it, and into what Principles to refolve it, it would not very much differ from his.
Page 68 - Induction too large to be made by one Man, or any Society of Men in one Age, if at all practicable : For whatever Opinion he might have of the...
Page 166 - THE Honour of reducing Geography to Art and Syftem, was referv'd to Ptolemy ; who by adding Mathematical Advantages to the Hiftorical Method, in which it had been treated of before, has defcrib'd the World in a much more intelligible manner : He has delineated it under more certain Rules; and by fixing the Bounds of Places from Longitude and Latitude, has both difcover'd others Miftakes, and has left us a Method of difcovering his own.
Page 126 - Heaven j yet this way feems too fupernatural whilft on Earth, and too clear for frail and weak Men, who are not yet to know by Vifion ; and it is withal fo like the inward Light of a New Sect of Men, as not to make it over reputable : To which purpofe...
Page 56 - Dress and jingle of Words. And tho in the following Reign, this way of writing was much laid aside, yet even then they larded their Discourses so thick with Sentences of Greek and Latin, that as things now are, it would be a hard matter to excuse them from Pedantry. What sort of Oratory obtain'd in the late times of Confusion, is well known, especially in the Pulpit: As if the observation of our Neighbours had been calculated...
Page 115 - Soul, than in the whole Mafs of Matter, be it never fo bulky. There cannot then be any Abfurdity in faying, That all Things were created for the fake of this inferior World, and the Inhabitants thereof ; and they that have fuch mean Thoughts of it, feem not to have confider'd who it was that died to Redeem it.
Page 147 - Y and Geography have been look'd upon as the two Eyes of Hiftory : If thefe fhine dim, our Hiftory muft be yet more obfcure > without thefe it lies in Confufion, is only a Heap of indigefted Matter, flat and infipid, and will neither profit nor delight in Reading. It is Time and Place that give Life as well...
Page 129 - Hiftory, if you will take an Account of him from his Preface, and not be too nice in examining his Book...
Page 225 - Methods: At one time they keep their Patients fo clofe and warm, as almoft to ftifle them with Care, and all on a fudden the Cold Regimen is in Vogue; In one Age Alkalies are in...
Page 56 - Ciceronian style in English, both in the length of their periods, and often by throwing the verb to the end of the Sentence: The succeeding Reign degenerated rather than improv'd, when the generality run into an affected way of writing and nothing would please, without a fantastick Dress and jingle of Words. And tho in the following Reign, this way of writing was much laid aside, yet even then they larded their Discourses so thick with Sentences of Greek and Latin, that as things now are, it would...

Bibliographic information