Reform Judaism Today

Front Cover
Behrman House, Inc, Jan 1, 1983 - Religion - 800 pages
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Contents

What Reform Judaism
1
Reform As a Revolutionary Movement
11
Material Design Requirements
15
Three Battles Largely Won
27
STEEL DESIGNERS HANDBOOK
37
The Centurys Experience As Validation
41
The Lessons Reform Judaism
47
The Three Pivotal Recent Experiences
56
Some Ways in Which We Are Ethnic 80
80
Tor ah 103
103
How Broad Is Our Modern Sense
145
Tension Members
176
An Introduction to the Obligations 3
3
The Religious Duties of a Reform Jew 15
15
Jewish Responsibility 36
36
Autonomy and Its Limits 45
45

Beams Girders
64
The New Balance in Reform
75
Continuing Reforms Messianic Hope
85
Living with Reform Judaisms
91
The Recent Polarization
106
Ten Affirmations
114
Six Limits
123
The Response III The Reform
131
An Introduction to the Principles 3
3
nptorS Design Actions 29
29
The People Israel 51
51
and Peoplehood 73
73
The State of Israel and the Diaspora 57
57
AntiZionist? 86
86
World Jewry in Dialogue 95
95
The People of Israel and All People 101
101
of Democracy 122
122
Tension Between Jewish and Human
128
On Living with a Conflict of Duties 137
137
The Conclusion Hope in a Time
149
Connections 194
194
Plastic Design 264
202
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About the author (1983)

Eugene Borowitz is considered the most original and influential Reform Jewish thinker today. A Reform rabbi and professor at Columbia University and the Hebrew Union College in New York, he is the founder and editor of Sh'ma: A Journal of Jewish Responsibility, a publication that promotes open discussion of controversial topics from all Judaic perspectives. Borowitz rejects the notion that Judaism is based on a heteronomous tradition or Jewish law; instead, he stresses the importance of autonomous choice and personal faith. Borowitz claims that a covenantal relationship with God forms the core of Reform Jewish theology and ethics.

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