Reforming Financial Systems: Historical Implications for Policy

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Gerard Caprio, Jr., Dimitri Vittas
Cambridge University Press, Jan 25, 2007 - Business & Economics - 236 pages
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This volume summarizes the key lessons of financial history for emerging market and developing economies, mostly drawn from when OECD economies themselves were industrializing and did not possess the checks, balances, and supervisory capabilities they have today. The topics include the role of central banks, debates on how to make banking secure and sound, the relative efficiency of universal banking (compared with the Anglo-American commercial banking model), and the role of savings banks, nonbanks, and securities markets in development.
 

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Contents

Lessons of the past for reformers of the present
1
2 The evolution of central banking
22
The Scottish experience as a model for emerging economies
41
Canada and the United States 18701980
65
5 Deposit insurance
85
Useful policy for developing countries?
101
7 Universal banking and the financing of industrial development
113
A selective historical overview of Japans prewar financial system
128
9 Thrift deposit institutions in Europe and the United States
141
10 The development of industrial pensions in the United States during the twentieth century Samuel H Williamson
180
What can government do? Richard Sylla
198
Index
217
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