Regional Orders: Building Security in a New World

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Penn State Press, Nov 1, 2010 - Political Science - 406 pages
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Conflict among nations for forty-five years after World War II was dominated by the major bipolar struggle between the United States and the Soviet Union. With the end of the Cold War, states in differing regions of the world are taking their affairs more into their own hands and working out new arrangements for security that best suit their needs. This trend toward new "regional orders" is the subject of this book, which seeks both to document the emergence and strengthening of these new regional arrangements and to show how international relations theory needs to be modified to take adequate account of their salience in the world today. The editors conclude that, in the new world of regional orders, the quest for universal principles of foreign policy by great powers like the United States is chimerical and dangerous. Regional orders differ, and policy must accommodate these differences if it is to succeed.
 

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Contents

The New Regionalism in Security Affairs
3
Regional Security Complexes and Regional Orders
20
Regional Security Complexes A Systems Approach
45
Economic Liberalization Political Coalitions and Emerging Regional Orders
68
Geostructuralism and International Politics The End of the Cold War and the Regionalization of International Security
101
Great Powers and Regional Orders Possibilities and Prospects After the Cold War
125
Concerts and Regional Intervention
140
Matters of Multilateralism Implications for Regional Conflict Management
165
AsiaPacific Regional Security Balance of Power or Concert of Powers?
245
Building Order in ArabIsraeli Relations From Balance to Concert?
271
Rethinking African Regional Security
296
ASEAN and the Southeast Asian Security Complex
318
Building Security in the New World of Regional Orders
343
References
355
About the Editors and Contributors
391
Index
393

Regional Conflict Management in Latin America Power Complemented by Diplomacy
195
From Hierarchy to Hegemony The PostSoviet Security Complex
219

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About the author (2010)

David A. Lake is Professor of Political Science at the University of California, San Diego.

Patrick M. Morgan is Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Irvine.

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