Regions and Powers: The Structure of International Security

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Cambridge University Press, Dec 4, 2003 - Political Science - 564 pages
2 Reviews
This book develops the idea that since decolonisation, regional patterns of security have become more prominent in international politics. The authors combine an operational theory of regional security with an empirical application across the whole of the international system. Individual chapters cover Africa, the Balkans, CIS Europe, East Asia, EU Europe, the Middle East, North America, South America, and South Asia. The main focus is on the post-Cold War period, but the history of each regional security complex is traced back to its beginnings. By relating the regional dynamics of security to current debates about the global power structure, the authors unfold a distinctive interpretation of post-Cold War international security, avoiding both the extreme oversimplifications of the unipolar view, and the extreme deterritorialisations of many globalist visions of a new world disorder. Their framework brings out the radical diversity of security dynamics in different parts of the world.
 

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Contents

Theories and histories about the structure of contemporary international security
6
A brief modern history of regional security
14
the different state legacies of regional security complexes
20
Conclusions
26
Levels distinguishing the regional from the global The how and why of distinguishing the regional from the global level
27
The problem of polarity postCold War
30
Conclusions
37
Security complexes a theory of regional security
40
Introduction
263
North America the sole superpower and its surroundings
268
The formation of an RSC in North America
270
The structure of the Cold War RSC
283
Security in North America after the Cold War
288
Conclusions
301
South America an underconflictual anomaly?
304
The origins and character of the RSC
305

Security at the regional level
43
main variables
45
a matrix for area studies
51
scenarios
65
constructivist method and the wider agenda of securitisation studies
70
Place in the literature
77
Conclusions
83
Asia
91
Introduction
93
South Asia inching towards internal and external transformation
101
continuity or transformation?
105
Conclusions
124
Northeast and Southeast Asian RSCs during the Cold War
128
The domestic level
129
The regional level
130
The interregional level
136
The global level and East Asia
138
Conclusions
142
The 1990s and beyond an emergent East Asian complex
144
The domestic level
145
The subcomplex level
152
The regional level
155
an expanding supercomplex
164
The global level
166
Conclusions
170
scenarios for the Asian supercomplex
172
Conflict formation
174
Security regime
175
The Middle East and Africa
183
Introduction
185
The Middle East a perennial conflict formation
187
The postCold War peace process and its failure
201
Conclusions
215
SubSaharan Africa security dynamics in a setting of weak and failed states
219
The domestic level
224
The regional level
229
The interregional level
248
The global level
249
Conclusions
252
Conclusions
254
The Middle East
256
Interplay between the Middle East and Africa
258
The Americas
261
The Cold War
311
PostCold War changes
320
Conclusions
337
scenario for the RSCs of the Americas
340
The Europes
341
Introduction
343
Formation of the European RSC
345
Operation of the RSC until 1989
346
EUEurope the European Union and its near abroad
352
European security during the Cold War
353
the EU core
356
Securitisation in the eastern circles
364
The outer circles of EUEurope
368
Regional institutions and traditional security
370
EUEuropes global standing selfsecuring? interregionally active? global power?
372
Conclusions
374
The Balkans and Turkey
377
Emergence of the main Balkan units
379
Security dynamics in Southeastern Europe after the dissolution of Yugoslavia
384
the Balkans as Europe
386
Turkey
391
Conclusions
395
The postSoviet space a regional security complex around Russia
397
History before 1991
398
Evolution of the RSC 19912002
403
Conclusions
435
scenarios for the European supercomplex
437
Conclusions
441
Introduction
443
Regions and powers summing up and looking ahead
445
the outlook for RSCs
448
Global level dynamics
455
Reflections on conceptualising international security
461
Comparing regions
468
The advantages of the regionalist approach to security
480
Problems in applying regional security complex theory
483
Glossary
489
References
493
News media
541
Index of names
543
General index
546
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About the author (2003)

Barry Buzan is Professor of International Relations at the LSE.

Ole Wver is Professor of International Relations at the Department of Political Science, University of Copenhagen.

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