Registration of Title to Land: What it Is, why it is Needed, and how it May be Effected

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Longman, Green, 1863 - Land titles - 251 pages
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Page 10 - ... lord, he shall be ungirt and his head uncovered, and his lord shall sit and the tenant shall kneel before him on both his knees, and hold his hands jointly together between the hands of his lord, and shall say thus : I become your man, from this day forward, of life and limb, and of earthly worship, and unto you shall be true and faithful, and bear you faith for the tenements that I claim to hold of you, saving the faith that I owe to our sovereign lord the king ; and then the lord, so sitting,...
Page 20 - If a feoffment be made upon this condition, that the feoffee shall not alien the land to any, this condition is void, because, when a man is infeoffed of lands or tenements, he hath power to alien them to any person by the law : for, if such a condition should be good, then the condition should oust him of all the power which the law gives him, which should be against reason, and therefore such a condition is void.
Page 83 - The identity of the lands with the parcels or descriptions contained in the title deeds shall be fully established ; and the registrar shall have power by such inquiries as he shall think fit to ascertain the accuracy of the description and the quantities and boundaries of the lands ; and, except in the case of incorporeal hereditaments, a map or plan shall be made and deposited as part of the description.
Page 10 - For if a man would purchase lands or tenements in fee simple, it behoveth him to have these words in his purchase, To have and to hold to him and to his heirs; for these words, his heirs, make the estate of inheritance.
Page 28 - And the reason why such solemnity is required in the passing of a fine, is this; because the fine is so high a bar, and of so great force, and of a nature so powerful in itself, that it precludes not only those which are parties and privies to the fine, and their heirs, but all other persons in the world, who are of full age, out of prison, of sound memory, and within the four seas, the day of the fine levied; unless they put in their claim...
Page 28 - ... are parties and privies to the fine, and their heirs, but all other persons in the world, who are of full age, out of prison, of sound memory, and within the four seas, the day of the fine levied; unless they put in their claim on the foot of the fine within a year and a day.
Page 25 - But on every return-day in the term, the person summoned has three days of grace, beyond the day named in the writ, in which to make his appearance; and if he appears on the fourth day inclusive, quarto die post, it is sufficient.
Page 10 - I become your man from this day forward [of life and limb, and of earthly worship,] and unto you shall be true and faithful, and bear to you faith for the tenements that I claim to hold of you, saving the faith that I owe unto our sovereign lord the king ; and then the lord, so sitting, shall kiss him.
Page 28 - ... that it concludeth not only such as be parties and privies thereto, and their heirs, but all other people of the world, being of full age, out of prison, of sound memory, and within the four seas, the day of the fine levied, if they make not their claim within a year and a day.
Page 82 - I have ventured to suggest, at least for further discussion. If arbitrators were publicly appointed, before whom parties themselves might go in the first instance, state their grounds of contention, and hear the calm opinion of able and judicious men, upon their own statements...

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