Regulating the Poor: The Functions of Public Welfare

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Feb 8, 2012 - Social Science - 544 pages
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Piven and Cloward have updated their classic work on the history and function of welfare to cover the American welfare state's massive erosion during the Reagan, Bush, and Clinton years. The authors present a boldly comprehensive, brilliant new theory to explain the comparative underdevelopment of the U.S. welfare state among advanced industrial nations. Their conceptual framework promises to shape the debate within current and future administrations as they attempt to rethink the welfare system and its role in American society.

"Uncompromising and provocative....By mixing history, political interpretation and sociological analysis, Piven and Cloward provide the best explanation to date of our present situation...no future discussion of welfare can afford to ignore them."
—Peter Steinfels, The New York Times Book Review
 

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User Review  - WabiWasabi - LibraryThing

I read this book as an undergrad and my lasting impression is that it went on forever. As a resource on poverty and the welfare system, this book can't be beat. It's worth the time but is so chock full of information that it warrants more than one glance. Read full review

Contents

RELIEF AND THE POLITICAL PROCESS
38
The New Deal and Relief
80
FOUR
123
Administrative Methods
147
Relief and the Urban Crisis
183
Agricultural Modernization and Mass Unemployment
200
Migration and the Rise of Disorder in the Cities
222
Federal Intervention
248
THE FEDERAL STRATEGY IN TIIE cITIEs
256
Local Consequences
285
Poor Relief and the Dramaturgy of Work
343
IWELVE
407
Appendix
456
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About the author (2012)

Frances Fox Piven is Distinguished Professor of Political Science, Graduate School and University Center, City University of New York.

Richard A. Cloward was a social worker and sociologist, and was a faculty member at the Columbia University School of Social Work from 1954 until his death in 2001.

They co-authored: The Politics of Turmoil, Poor People's Movements, The New Class War, and Why Americans Don't Vote. They won the C. Wright Mills Award and various international and national awards.

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