Relative Grief: Parents and children, sisters and brothers, husbands, wives and partners, grandparents and grandchildren talk about their experience of death and grieving

Front Cover
Jessica Kingsley Publishers, May 15, 2005 - Family & Relationships - 208 pages
0 Reviews
In this collection of first-hand accounts, parents, grandparents, children, siblings and partners share their experiences of losing close relatives and friends through death from natural causes, genetic conditions, accident, suicide and murder. Looking at death from these different perspectives, it aims to encourage people to understand their own grief and how those closest to them might be affected by what can seem a very private loss. The introduction examines the short- and long-term effects of recent and past loss, the duration and intensity of mourning, and the difficult and often conflicting feelings and behaviours that accompany it: loneliness, anger, guilt or relief, the birth - or loss of - religious faith, out-of-character behaviour triggered by shock, and `competitive' grief among close relatives and friends. Relative Grief is of interest to anyone who has been bereaved or supported someone who has. It will also be useful for those working with the bereaved, particularly hospice nurses, social workers, counsellors and therapists.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
6
Foreword by Dorothy Rowe
7
Introduction
9
1 Mothers
19
2 Fathers
43
3 Daughters
63
4 Sons
77
5 Sisters
101
7 Wives
135
8 Husbands
151
9 Partners
163
10 Grandparents
175
11 Grandchildren
183
12 Friends
191
USEFUL CONTACTS
201
USEFUL BOOKS
205

6 Brothers
119

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 9 - I am too much i' the sun. QUEEN. Good Hamlet, cast thy nighted colour off, And let thine eye look like a friend on Denmark. Do not for ever with thy vailed lids Seek for thy noble father in the dust: Thou know'st 'tis common; all that live must die, Passing through nature to eternity. HAMLET. Ay, madam, it is common. QUEEN. If it be, Why seems it so particular with thee? HAMLET. Seems, madam! Nay, it is; I know not
Page 22 - You never get over the loss. You learn to live with it, but you never get over it.

About the author (2005)

Clare Jenkins is a freelance journalist and broadcaster for BBC Radio 4. Her previous book, A Passion for Priests, looked at women's relationships with Roman Catholic Priests. Clare lives in Sheffield, UK. Judy Merry was a freelance producer and presenter working mainly for BBC Radio 4. She was also the book reviewer for BBC Radio 2's Good Morning Sunday programme.

Bibliographic information