Relearning from Las Vegas

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Aron Vinegar, Michael J. Golec
U of Minnesota Press, 2009 - Architecture - 221 pages
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Evaluates for the first time one of the foundational works in architecture criticism. Immediately on its publication in 1972, Learning from Las Vegas, by Robert Venturi, Denise Scott Brown, and Steven Izenour, was hailed as a transformative work in the history and theory of architecture, liberating those in architecture who were trying to find a way out of the straitjacket of architectural orthodoxies. Resonating far beyond the professional and institutional boundaries of the field, the book contributed to a thorough rethinking of modernism and was subsequently taken up as an early manifestation and progenitor of postmodernism.
 

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Contents

Instruction as Provocation
1
A Nelson Goodman Reading of the Las Vegas Strip
19
2 Format and Layout in Learning from Las Vegas
31
3 Photorealism Kitsch and Venturi
49
4 Theory as Ornament
79
Representing the American Landscape
97
6 On Billboards and Other Signs around Learning from Las Vegas
129
7 Signs Taken for Wonders
147
8 The Melodrama of Expression and Inexpression in the Duck and Decorated Shed
163
9 Learning from Las Vegas and Los Angeles and Reyner Banham
195
Contributors
211
Publication History
213
Index
215
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Aron Vinegar is Assistant Professor in the Department of History of Art at Ohio State University.

MICHAEL J. GOLEC is an Assistant Professor of art and design history at Iowa State University. He is the author of American Design Culture (forthcoming) and the co-editor of Instruction and Provocation, or Relearning from Las Vegas.

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