Religion, Reform and Modernity in the Eighteenth Century: Thomas Secker and the Church of England

Front Cover
Boydell Press, 2007 - Religion - 310 pages
1 Review
The eighteenth century has long divided critical opinion. Some contend that it witnessed the birth of the modern world, while others counter that England remained an ancien regime confessional state. This book takes issue with both positions, arguing that the former overstate the newness of the age and largely misdiagnose the causes of change, while the latter rightly point to the persistence of more traditional modes of thought and behaviour, but downplay the era's fundamental uncertainty and misplace the reasons for and the timeline of its passage. The overwhelming catalyst for change is here seen to be war, rather than long-term social and economic changes. Archbishop Thomas Secker (1693-1768), the Cranmer or Laud of his age, and the hitherto neglected church reforms he spearheaded, form the particular focus of the book; this is the first full archivally-based study of a crucial but frequently ignored figure. ROBERT G. INGRAM is Assistant Professor at the Department of History, Ohio University.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Becoming an Anglican
19
Becoming an Insider
45
The Church and the Enlightenment
71
The Church and the Parishioners
114
The Church and the State
157
The Church and America
209
The Church and Churches Abroad
260
Epilogue
283
Index
303
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information