Religion and Peacebuilding

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Harold Coward, Gordon S. Smith
SUNY Press, Jan 16, 2004 - Political Science - 320 pages
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In the wake of September 11, 2001 religion is often seen as the motivating force behind terrorism and other acts of violence. Religion and Peacebuilding looks beyond headlines concerning violence perpetrated in the name of religion to examine how world religions have also inspired social welfare and peacemaking activism. Leading scholars from the Aboriginal, Hindu, Buddhist, Confucian, Jewish, Muslim, and Christian traditions provide detailed analyses of the spiritual resources for fostering peace within their respective religions. The contributors discuss the formidable obstacles to nonviolent conflict transformation found within sacred texts and living traditions. Case studies of Northern Ireland, Bosnia, Cambodia, and South Africa are also examined as practical applications of spiritual resources for peace.
 

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Contents

SPIRITUAL RESOURCES WITHIN RELIGIONS FOR PEACEBUILDING
25
Hinduism and Peacebuilding
45
Buddhism and
69
Confucianism and Peacebuilding
93
Judaism and Peacebuilding
111
Continuities and Transitions
129
Interreligious Initiatives for Peace
169
Cambodia
191
Religion as Provocateur
213
The South Africa Case
243
Religion and the Peace Process
261
From Potential to Action
279
List of Contributors
303
Index
309
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About the author (2004)

Harold Coward is with the Centre for Studies in Religion and Society at the University of Victoria and is the author and editor of many books, including most recently Yoga and Psychology: Language, Memory, and Mysticism, also published by SUNY Press.

Gordon S. Smith is Director of the Centre for Global Studies at the University of Victoria and the author and editor of many books, including (with Daniel Wolfish) Who Is Afraid of the State?: Canada in a World of Multiple Centres of Power.

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