Religion and Scientific Method

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Springer Science & Business Media, Sep 30, 1977 - Philosophy - 204 pages
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I With the immense success of modem science it has generally become accepted that the only way to acquire knowledge is by the use of the method uniformly practiced by working scientists. Consequently, the credibility of the claims of religion, which seem to be based on belief in revelation, tradition, authority and the like, have been considerably shaken. In the face of the serious threat provided by the ascendancy of modem scientific method ology, religious thinkers have adopted various defensive attitudes. Some have retreated into an extreme position where Theism is completely safe from any attack on it by the use of empirical methods of inquiry, maintaining that contrary to appearances, religion makes no factual claims whatsoever. To be religious, they say, is to subscribe to a certain value system; it is to adopt a set of practices and a given attitude to the meaning and purpose of life without making any assertions about this or that empirical feature of the universe. Others wishing to remain more faithful to what religion traditionally meant throughout the ages, agree that Theism does make factual claims but that these are so radically different from the kind of claims made by science that it is only right that they should be established by a separate method on its own. In matters of faith reliance on widely entrenched tradition and sacred authority is not objectionable according to some.
 

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Contents

Stating the Problem of Evil
9
The Standard by which Divine Acts
18
The Question of an Afterlife
27
TheSoul MakingTheodicy
42
The Justification for Creating Opportunities
52
A New Solution
59
A Conflict Between Religion and Science
83
The Unpredictability of Some Human Choices
91
Machines and 6Machines
125
PART III
133
Pascals Wager
135
Theism and the Verification Principle
141
The Vindication of the Verification Principle
149
The Principles Underlying Scientific Method
157
Miracles
173
The Evidence for Theism
182

Some Queries Concerning the Absolute Incompetence of Predictors
99
The Predictor as a Diagnostician
104
aMachines and Machines
119
Theism and Scientific Method
193
INDEX
202
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