Religion and Violence: Philosophical Perspectives from Kant to Derrida

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JHU Press, Nov 6, 2001 - Philosophy - 443 pages
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Does violence inevitably shadow our ethico-political engagements and decisions, including our understandings of identity, whether collective or individual? Questions that touch upon ethics and politics can greatly benefit from being rephrased in terms borrowed from the arsenal of religious and theological figures, because the association of such figures with a certain violence keeps moralism, whether in the form of fideism or humanism, at bay. Religion and Violence: Philosophical Perspectives from Kant to Derrida's careful posing of such questions and rearticulations pioneers new modalities for systematic engagement with religion and philosophy alike.

 

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Contents

III
1
IV
18
V
25
VI
49
VII
57
VIII
67
IX
87
X
102
XXIV
236
XXV
251
XXVI
256
XXVII
266
XXVIII
275
XXIX
287
XXX
293
XXXI
296

XI
110
XII
123
XIII
139
XIV
142
XV
160
XVI
175
XVII
178
XVIII
187
XIX
200
XX
211
XXI
213
XXII
215
XXIII
223
XXXII
300
XXXIII
307
XXXIV
325
XXXV
335
XXXVI
349
XXXVII
353
XXXVIII
362
XXXIX
370
XL
388
XLI
399
XLII
433
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About the author (2001)

Hent de Vries is professor of Modern European Thought in the Humanities Center and the Department of Philosophy at the Johns Hopkins University and professor of Philosophy at the University of Amsterdam. Among his books are Philosophy and the Turn to Religion and Minimal Theologies: Critiques of Secular Reason in Adorno and Levinas, both available from Johns Hopkins. He is the co-editor, with Samuel Weber, of Violence, Identity, and Self-Determination and Religion and Media, and, with Mieke Bal, of the book series Cultural Memory in the Present.

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