Religious Division and Social Conflict: The Emergence of Hindu Nationalism in Rural India

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Berghahn Books, 2007 - History - 295 pages

Claude Lanzmann's nine-and-a-half-hour 1985 epic Shoah - its title is the Hebrew word for "catastrophe" - is the distillation of more than 350 hours of film gathered over 11 years. It tells the story of the Holocaust through interviews with the survivors, bystanders, and perpetrators. In 2000, the Guardian film critic Derek Malcolm called it "one of the most remarkable films ever made." It has also provoked debates about the very possibility of Holocaust representation. Sue Vice provides a devoted study of the film, discussing the problematic role of Lanzmann as the director and the numerous controversies and conclusions that Shoah has produced. Some of the topics she covers are: Lanzmann as filmmaker, mise-en-scene, Lanzmann as interviewer, the ethics of filming, testimony, and more.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
List of Figures
25
Adivasi Hindus and the RSS
40
Adivasi Christians and the Church
77
List of Graphs
110
Health Biomedicine and the RSS
115
Local Corruption and the Politics of Inclusion
145
Land Relations and Local Tensions
180
Liquor Disputes and the Communalization
220
Conclusion
256
Bibliography
267
Index
288
Copyright

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Page 269 - A SKETCH of the State of BRITISH INDIA, with a View of pointing out the best Means of Civilizing its Inhabitants, and diffusing the Knowledge of Christianity throughout the Eastern, World : being the Substance of an Essay on these Subjects ; to which the University of Aberdeen adjudged Dr.

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