Reload: Rethinking Women + Cyberculture

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Mary Flanagan, Austin Booth
MIT Press, 2002 - Literary Criticism - 581 pages
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Most writing on cyberculture is dominated by two almost mutually exclusive visions: the heroic image of the male outlaw hacker and the utopian myth of a gender-free cyberworld. Reload offers an alternative picture of cyberspace as a complex and contradictory place where there is oppression as well as liberation. It shows how cyberpunk's revolutionary claims conceal its ultimate conservatism on matters of class, gender, and race. The cyberfeminists writing here view cyberculture as a social experiment with an as-yet-unfulfilled potential to create new identities, relationships, and cultures.The book brings together women's cyberfiction--fiction that explores the relationship between people and virtual technologies--and feminist theoretical and critical investigations of gender and technoculture. From a variety of viewpoints, the writers consider the effects of rapid and profound technological change on culture, in particular both the revolutionary and reactionary effects of cyberculture on women's lives. They also explore the feminist implications of the cyborg, a human-machine hybrid. The writers challenge the conceptual and institutional rifts between high and low culture, which are embedded in the texts and artifacts of cyberculture.

 

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Reload: rethinking women + cyberculture

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Women writers, many of them lesbian feminists, have begun to explore the relationships between humans and machines. Along the way, they are rethinking how race, class, and gender affect technological ... Read full review

Contents

IV
1
V
25
VI
42
VII
48
VIII
64
IX
85
X
107
XI
123
XXI
321
XXII
332
XXIII
355
XXIV
374
XXV
403
XXVI
415
XXVII
425
XXVIII
456

XII
148
XIII
158
XIV
175
XV
195
XVI
209
XVII
234
XVIII
239
XIX
261
XX
301
XXIX
461
XXX
469
XXXI
505
XXXII
519
XXXIII
539
XXXIV
546
XXXV
578
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About the author (2002)

Austin Booth is Director of Collections and Research Services at State University of New York at Buffalo.

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