Remarks Made at the Annual Meeting of the Boston Society of Natural History, June 2, 1846: Showing the Origin and History of the Society, Its Influence on the Cultivation of the Natural Sciences in New England, Its Present Condition and Wants, and Its Claims Upon the Liberality of the Public

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Freeman and Bolles, 1845 - 16 pages
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Page 10 - ... not, I believe, in New England, an institution devoted to the study of natural history. There was not a college in New England, excepting Yale, where philosophical geology of the modern school was taught. There was not a work extant by a New England author which presumed to grasp the geological structure of any portion of our territory of greater extent than a county. There was not in existence a bare catalogue, to say nothing of a general history, of the animals of Massachusetts, of any class....
Page 10 - ... foreign to New England for our knowledge of our own Zoology. There was no one among us who had anything like a general knowledge of the birds which fly about us, of the fishes which fill our waters, or of the lower tribes of animals that swarm both in air and in the sea. Some few individuals there were, distinguished by high attainments in particular branches, and who formed honorable exceptions to the indifference which prevailed ; but there was no concentration of opinions or of knowledge,...
Page 10 - Society there was not, I believe, in New England, an institution devoted to the study of natural history. There was not a college in New England, excepting Yale, where philosophical geology of the modern school was taught. There was not a work extant by a New England author which presumed to grasp the geological structure of any portion of our territory of greater extent than a county. There was not in existence a bare catalogue, to say nothing of a general...
Page 10 - ... ments and based upon the system of modern science, nor a single journal advocating exclusively its interests. We were dependent chiefly upon books and authors foreign to New England for our knowledge of our own Zoology. There was no one among us who had anything like a general knowledge of the birds which fly about us, of the fishes which fill our waters, or of the lower tribes of animals that swarm both in air and in the sea.
Page 10 - History, founded according to the requirements, and based upon the systems of modern science, nor a single journal advocating exclusively its interests. We were dependent chiefly upon books and authors foreign to New England, for our knowledge of our own Zoology. There was no one among us who had anything like a general knowledge of the birds which fly about us, of the fishes which fill our waters...
Page 12 - We are no \ longer obliged to look to foreigners for information upon our ! natural history, but on the other hand, learned foreign naturalists are coming among us to learn the results of our labors, and we are doing our part to pay back the long accumulating debt of knowledge which we owe to the science of Europe.
Page 11 - There is now a considerable number of institutions devoted to Natural History, and nearly all of them are the direct offspring of this Society, having been founded by 11 its members. The geological structure of New England is now as well understood as that of any equally large part of Europe. Geological surveys of each of the six New England States have been authorized by their governments, and in five of them the work has been performed by members of this society.
Page 10 - ... from others engaged in the same pursuits, and without the approbation of the public mind, which, unenlightened as it was, yielded no honor to persons occupied with such studies, but on the contrary, regarded them as busy triflers. What is the condition of things now...
Page 11 - What is the condition of things now, and to what is the change owing ? There is now a considerable number of institutions devoted to Natural History, and nearly all of them are the direct offspring of this Society, having been founded by 11 its members.
Page 13 - ... pursuits. The result of this judicious policy has been the training of an active corps of young naturalists, some of whom have already given ample evidence of their ability to achieve for themselves a high reputation.

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