Remarks on the architecture of the Middle ages, especially of Italy

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 3 - The curious result is a style in which the horizontal and vertical lines equally predominate, and which, while it wants alike the lateral extension and repose of the Grecian, and the lofty upward tendency and pyramidal majesty of the Gothic, is yet replete with many an interesting and valuable architectural lesson.
Page 6 - ... also speaks of this uniformity of style which prevailed everywhere throughout all countries as one of the most remarkable facts connected with the history of mediaeval architecture. And he cites the remark of Willis in his Architecture of the Middle Ages, that whereas in our own age it is the practice to imitate every style of architecture that can be found in all the countries of the earth, it appears that in any given period and place our forefathers admitted but of one style, which was used...
Page 197 - ... various peculiarities which characterise the arrangements of the Italian Gothic, such as the wide and low pier arches whose span equals the breadth of the nave, the absence of the triforium and of the clerestory string, the great empty circles which occupy the space of the clerestory, the extensive doming of the vaults, the shallowness of the side aisles, the heavy capitals which surround the piers and half piers like a band of leaves, and the squareness of the piers with their nook shafts ;...
Page 197 - ... edifice ; but the size and peculiar simplicity of the design produce an effect which reminds the English traveller of the purer Gothic of the north. " It possesses in a high degree the various peculiarities which characterise the arrangements of the Italian Gothic, such as the wide and low pier arches whose span equals the breadth of the nave, the absence of the triforium and of the clerestory string, the great empty circles which occupy the space of the clerestory, the extensive doming of the...
Page 197 - ... the clerestory string, the great empty circles which occupy the space of the clerestory, the extensive doming of the vaults, the shallowness of the side aisles, the heavy capitals which surround the piers and half piers like a band of leaves, and the squareness of the piers with their nook shafts ; all these serve to make a wide distinction between this example and those of the genuine Gothic ; and they are rarely found so completely united even in Italian churches. Each compartment of the side...
Page 21 - ... characters : a new decorative construction was matured, not thwarting and controlling, but assisting and harmonizing with the mechanical construction. All the ornamental parts were made to enter into the apparent construction. Every member, almost every moulding, became a sustainer of weight ; and by the multiplicity of props assisting each other, and the consequent subdivision of weight, the eye was satisfied of the stability of the structure, notwithstanding the curiously slender forms of the...
Page 11 - All countries, in adopting a neighbouring style, seem however to have worked it with some peculiarities of their own, so that a person conversant with examples can tell, upon inspecting a building, not only to what period it belongs, but to what nation. Much depends on material, much on 300 LATIN CHRISTIANITY.
Page 17 - Greeks was founded upon a mechanical structure that only exerted perpendicular pressures, it is clear that the diagonal ones must be concealed by huge rectangular masses, decorated so as to appear as if sustaining vertical pressures only, unless we choose to invent new decorative forms for the diagonal props. The Romans attempted concealment, and hence introduced discordance between the decoration and the mechanism of the structure. The Gothic builders in later times more wisely adapted their decoration...
Page 22 - Greek notions of art which they seem never to have forgotten. They succeeded, however, in forming a style which I shall call Italian Gothic, of which the best specimens are those of Tuscany, especially of Florence; this arose at the end of the thirteenth century, about the same period at which the Decorated style was introduced into our own country. It is curious enough that in the Neapolitan territory, in Naples especially, many specimens or rather fragments of good Gothic buildings are to be found...
Page iii - ... particularly attracted my attention during the journey ; the undeserved neglect with which the Italian Gothic had been treated ; and the influence of locality upon each style of the middle age architecture. I was soon led to suspect that this architecture was susceptible of much more extended generalisations in its principles than had hitherto been attempted; and I have ventured to point out the road to some of the most obvious. " Amongst other objects, I was naturally led to search for evidence...

Bibliographic information