Remarks on the Study of Languages, and Hints on Comparative Translation and Philological Construing: Reprinted from "Old Price's Remains," with Other Articles, and an Introduction

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Longmans & Company, 1869 - Language and languages - 127 pages
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Page 33 - Take care of the pence and the pounds will take care of themselves is as true of personal habits as of money.
Page 109 - If any man think himself to be a prophet, or spiritual, let him acknowledge that the things that I write unto you are the commandments of the Lord.
Page 93 - This Jesus hath God raised up whereof we are all witnesses." Acts ii. 32. See also, in the " Evangelical sermons " of that day, how important a place this doctrine then held. Acts ii. 24 — 32; iii. 15; iv. 10 and 33; v. 31 ; x. 40; xiii. 30 — 37; xvii. 3 and 18; xxvi. 23. It is, then, not difficult to understand how Jesus Christ, after being put to death as an impostor — as one who, being a man, made himself God, — was most clearly defined, or definitely marked out, (opia-Bevros...
Page 89 - Think'st thou existence doth depend on time? It doth ; but actions are our epochs : mine Have made my days and nights imperishable, Endless, and all alike, as sands on the shore, Innumerable atoms; and one desert, Barren and cold, on which the wild waves break, But nothing rests, save carcasses and wrecks, Rocks, and the salt-surf weeds of bitterness.
Page 111 - ... children. Or he may utterly fail to make religion winsome and genial in its aspect ; he may present it only as a system of restraint and self-denial. Or he may too exclusively aim at cultivating the serious side of his children's nature, to the entire neglect of that which is mirthful and humorous. Human nature does possess this twofold side, and both have been given it by God.
Page 93 - ... 3 and 18; xxvi. 23. It is, then, not difficult to understand how Jesus Christ, after being put to death as an impostor — as one who, being a man, made himself God, — was most clearly defined, or definitely marked out, (oplcrdevros,) as the Son of God in power, by his resurrection from the dead.
Page 94 - Joseph" (Luke iii. 23) ; he was absolutely marked out, by his resurrection, to be what he had plainly declared himself to be — the Son of God in power, one with his Father, and whom his prophet had long before announced as "Wonderful, Counsellor, the Mighty God, the Everlasting Father, the Prince of Peace

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