Remarks on two pamphlets lately published against Dr. Middleton's Introductory discourse: The one, intituled, Observations on that discourse in answer to the author's prejudices, & c. The other, The Jesuit-cabal farther opened, or, A defence of Dr. Chapman's late charge ...

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Printed for R. Manby and H.S. Cox, 1748 - 128 pages
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Page xxxvi - Fathers and their traditions tends to lead us into the Church of Rome : we fee it afcribing a fupreme and independent power to the Church ; afferting the Popifh facraments ; a propitiatory...
Page 113 - For it was in these very primitive ages, and especially in the third, fourth, and fifth centuries, those flourishing times of miraculous powers, as Dr Chapman calls them, in which the chief corruptions of Popery were either actually introduced, or the seeds of them so effectually sown, that they could not fail of producing the fruits which we now see.
Page xxxvii - ... plans of Primitive Christianity, when published by Protestants, in any other light than as preliminary articles offered to the Church of Rome as the ground for a treaty of peace and reconciliation in which the few remaining points of difference might easily be accommodated. I am a perfect stranger to the author of this piece, nor have any other knowledge of his character than what has been signified to me by his writings and the report of common fame. The warm expressions of piety and devotion...
Page i - Christ ; as also the complete duty of a Christian in relation to faith, practice, worship, and rituals, set forth sincerely, without regard to any modern church, sect, or party...
Page 57 - It was not thepurpofeof thefe remarks, to caft a bleroifh on his envied fame; but to do a piece of juftice to the real merit both of the work, and " its author; by that beft and gentleft method ** of correction, which nature has ordained in " fuch a cafe; of laughing him down to his pro11 per rank and character.
Page xxxvii - ... doctrines which he has deduced from it are the essential parts of the Christian religion and of equal obligation with the Gospel itself. I could never consider these plans of Primitive Christianity, when published by Protestants, in any other light than as preliminary articles offered to the Church of Rome as the ground for a treaty of peace and reconciliation in which the few remaining points of difference might easily be accommodated. I am a perfect stranger to the author of this piece, nor...
Page xxxviii - ... perfect stranger to the author of this piece, nor have any other knowledge of his character than what has been signified to me by his writings and the report of common fame. The warm expressions of piety and devotion which run through his whole performance oblige me to think him an honest man. Fame also has informed me that he lives up to the character which his book points out to us : practises what he professes and is an example of that discipline which he prescribes to others.
Page 119 - ... brethren, by the gathering of his relics, but might be wholly devoured by them ; according as in his Epistle he had before wished, that so his end might be. For only the greater and harder of his holy bones remained ; which were carried to Antioch, and there put up in a napkin, as an inestimable treasure left to the Church by the grace which was in the martyr.

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