Rembrandt's Bankruptcy: The Artist, His Patrons, and the Art Market in Seventeenth-Century Netherlands

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Cambridge University Press, Feb 20, 2006 - Art - 221 pages
This study, first published in 2006, examines the causes, circumstances, and effects of the 1656 bankruptcy of Rembrandt van Rijn. Following a highly successful early career, Rembrandt's idiosyncratic art and lifestyle came to dominate his reputation. His evasion of responsibility to his creditors was so socially disreputable that laws in Amsterdam were quickly altered. The poor management of his finances magnified other difficulties that he had with family, paramours, friends, neighbors, and patrons. Collectively, Rembrandt's economic and social exigencies affected his living and working environment, his public station, and his art. This study examines all of these aspects of Rembrandt's bankruptcy, including his marketing practices, the appreciation of his work, and his relations with patrons, in addition to the details of the bankruptcy itself. Several patterns of short-sighted decision-making emerge as Rembrandt conducted his affairs within a constantly changing framework of relationships, a shifting set of obligations, and evolving artistic pursuits.
 

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Contents

Section 1
9
Section 2
45
Section 3
54
Section 4
55
Section 5
59
Section 6
63
Section 7
65
Section 8
127
Section 9
129
Section 10
154

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About the author (2006)

Paul Crenshaw is assistant professor of art history and archaeology at Washington University in St Louis.

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