Remembering the End: Dostoevsky as Prophet to Modernity

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Westview Press, Mar 16, 2001 - Literary Criticism - 280 pages
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Dostoevsky was one of those writers of the nineteenth century who came to be regarded by many readers in the following century as a prophet. How does he remain prophetic for us now, in the early twenty-first century? Remembering the End explores and assesses Dostoevsky's critique of modernity, with particular focus on the Grand Inquisitor (in The Brothers Karamazov), where his prophetic vision finds its most intense expression. The authors write to elucidate the spiritual realism of Dostoevsky's biblically charged literary art, and to show how it can help us to remember who we are in this modern/postmodern moment in which--as individuals and members of communities--we are required to make critical choices about the meaning of justice, history, truth and happiness. The book will be of interest to readers in comparative literature, ethics, political theory, philosophy, religious studies and theology.
 

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Contents

Dostoevskis The Grand Inquisitor
35
Dostoevsky
57
Do You Despise or Love Humanity
135
Christ in The Grand Inquisitor
241
References
267
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Page 256 - Art Thou He that cometh or look we for another? And Jesus answered and said unto them, Go your way and tell John the things which ye do hear and see : the blind receive their sight and the lame walk, the lepers are cleansed and the deaf hear, and the dead are raised up and the poor have good tidings preached to them : and blessed is he whosoever shall find none occasion of stumbling in Me.
Page 120 - Behold, the dwelling of God is with men. He will dwell with them, and they shall be his people, and God himself will be with them; he will wipe away every tear from their eyes, and death shall be no more, neither shall there be mourning nor crying nor pain any more, for the former things have passed away.
Page 49 - Babel without us, they will end, of course, with cannibalism. But then the beast will crawl to us and lick our feet and spatter them with tears of blood. And we shall 'sit upon the beast and raise the cup, and on it will be written,
Page 130 - Now is the judgment of this world, now shall the ruler of this world be cast out; and I, when I am lifted up from the earth, will draw all men to myself.
Page 225 - Truly, I say to you, unless you turn and become like children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven.
Page 195 - If God were your father, you would love me, for I proceeded and came forth from God; I came not of my own accord, but he sent me.
Page 45 - In the end they will lay their freedom at our feet, and say to us, "Make us your slaves, but feed us.
Page 114 - Have this mind among yourselves, which is yours in Christ Jesus, who, though he was in the form of God, did not count equality with God a thing to be grasped, but emptied himself, taking the form of a servant, being born in the likeness of men. And being found in human form he humbled himself and became obedient unto death, even death on a cross.

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About the author (2001)

P. Travis Kroeker is associate professor of religious studies at McMaster University in Ontario. He is the author of Christian Ethics and Political Economy in North America. His articles have appeared in, among others, The Journal of Religion, The Annual of the Society of Christian Ethics, and Studies in Religion. Bruce K. Ward is professor of religious studies at Thorneloe College, Laurentian University in Ontario. He is also the author of Dostoevsky's Critique of the West: The Quest for the Earthly Paradise.

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