Reminiscences ...: With Memoirs of His Late Father and Friends, [etc].

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Page 209 - Harmonious numbers; as the wakeful bird Sings darkling, and in shadiest covert hid Tunes her nocturnal note.
Page 143 - Don't press, slow back, and keep your eye on the ball," he is, for practical purposes, denationalised. His other education proceeded on the pleasantest lines. Was he interested in any conceivable thing in heaven above, or the earth beneath, or the waters under the earth?
Page 201 - The meat being removed, in came the long wished for pudding. The doctor looked joyous, fell eagerly to, and in a few minutes nearly finished all the pudding. The table was cleared, and Boswell said — " ' Doctor, while I was eating the mutton you seemed frequently inclined to laugh ; pray, tell me, what tickled your fancy ?' " The doctor then literally told him all that had passed at the kitchen fire, about the boy and the basting.
Page 326 - Tale, where he astonished the audience, not merely by the beautiful colouring and designs, far superior to what they had been accustomed to, but by a sudden transition in a forest scene, where the foliage varies from green to blood colour. This contrivance was entirely new; and the effect was produced by placing different coloured silks in the flies or side scenes, which turned on a pivot, and with lights behind, which so illumined the stage as to give the effect of enchantment.
Page 199 - this inn was formerly kept by Andrew Macgregor, a relation of mine, and these hard-bottomed chairs (in which we are now sitting) were, years ago filled by the great tourists, Dr.
Page 297 - When she came off at the quick change of dress, she again complained of being ill; but got accoutred and returned to finish the part, and pronounced in the epilogue speech, * If it be true that good wine needs no bush — it is as true that a good play needs no epilogue,
Page 61 - Ye fair married dames, who so often deplore That a lover once blest is a lover no more, Attend to my counsel, nor blush to be taught That prudence must cherish what beauty has caught.
Page 200 - Boswell ushered the doctor into the house, and left him to prepare for this delicious treat. Johnson feeling his coat rather damp, from the mist of the mountains, went into the kitchen, and threw his upper garment on a chair before the fire : he sat on the hob, near a little boy who was very busy attending the meat. Johnson occasionally peeped from behind his coat, while the boy kept basting the mutton. Johnson did not like the appearance of his head ; when he shifted the basting ladle from one hand,...
Page 202 - The doctor gathered up his Herculean frame, stood erect, touched the ceiling with his wig, stared, or squinted — indeed, looked any way but the right way. At last, with mouth wide open (none of the smallest), and stomach heaving, he with some difficulty recovered his breath, and looking at Boswell with dignified contempt, he roared out, with the lungs of a Stentor — " ' Mr. Boswell, sir, leave off laughing ; and under pain of my eternal displeasure, never utter a single syllable of this abominable...
Page 200 - Boswell, travelling like the lion and jackal. Boswell generally preceded the doctor in search of food, and being much pleased with the look of the house, followed his nose into the larder, where he saw a fine leg of mutton. He ordered it to be roasted with the utmost expedition, and gave particular orders for a nice pudding. ' Now,' says he, ' make the best of all puddings.

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