Administration's views on rental housing legislation

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Page 7 - IT is APPARENT FROM OUR STUDY THAT ELDERLY AND LOW-INCOME TENANTS ARE NOT AS ADVERSELY IMPACTED BY CONVERSIONS AS MANY PREVIOUSLY BELIEVEDAT THE PRESENT TIME, I DO NOT SEE ANY JUSTIFICATION FOR A FEDERAL MORATORIUM ON CONVERSIONS OR FOR FEDERAL RESTRICTIONS WHERE HUD IS NOT INSURING OR SUBSIDIZING THE PROPERTY. BECAUSE THE SITUATION DIFFERS FROM MARKET TO MARKET, I BELIEVE LOCAL GOVERNMENTS ARE IN THE BEST POSITION TO DETERMINE WHETHER THEY FACE A PROBLEM, HOW SEVERE IT IS AND WHAT RESTRICTIONS OR...
Page 3 - ... Housing and Urban Affairs on February 27, projected that only 50,000 unsubsidized uninsured multifamily rental units would be started in 1980. In other words over 75 percent of multifamily rental starts in 1980 will be subsidized or insured by the Federal Government. Why? To quote Secretary Landrieu, "The reason is simple: Rental housing today is not perceived as a good investment in the building and financial community. The results of the low amount of rental production are becoming apparent....
Page 7 - Conversions remove units from the rental market; yet ironically, by en* couraging investment, conversion may be the best hope of preserving much of our existing housing stock. Conversions displace some lower income people, yet they also provide ownership opportunities for others priced out of the single family market.
Page 7 - At the present time, I do not see any justification for a Federal moratorium on conversions or for Federal restrictions where HUD is not insuring or subsidizing the property. Because the situation differs from market to market, I believe local governments are best situated to determine whether they face a problem, how severe it is and what restrictions or conditions, if any, are appropriate.
Page 33 - ... investigations, physical examinations, personnel policies, benefit plans, grievance handling, labor negotiations, and executive performance appraisal. If this sounds like a big order, it is. But not because the functions enumerated are new to industrial relations practitioners. Both the literature and even a cursory review of what is being done in the field reflect a substantial acceptance of the challenge implicit in this brief and incomplete listing of today's industrial relations job and substantial...
Page 7 - Department is conducting a study of conversions to determine their extent, their impact on tentants, neighborhoods, and cities, and the conditions under which they take place. We will await the results of this study before making any policy recommendations to the Congress.