Rents in the District of Columbia: Hearings Before a Subcommittee of the Committee on the District of Columbia, United States Senate, Seventy-Second Congress, Second Session on S. Res. 248, a Resolution to Investigate Rental Conditions in the District of Columbia, Volume 1

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Page 26 - ... to take such testimony, and to make such expenditures, as it deems advisable. The cost of stenographic services to report such hearings shall not be in excess of 25 cents per hundred words. The expenses of the committee, which shall not exceed $30,000, shall be paid from the contingent fund of the Senate upon vouchers approved by the chairman of the committee or the chairman of any duly authorized subcommittee thereof.
Page 124 - The court held it was not a defense againt foreclosure. Senator COPELAND. That it was not a defense? Mr. SCHICK. That it was not. They took it to the court of appeals and the court of appeals affirmed the lower court on that point, but said in their opinion that there was usury in that transaction and that we were entitled to recover only the exact amount which was paid for the note.
Page 26 - The committee or subcommittee, upon discovering in the course of its inquiry evidence of any criminal action, shall promptly communicate such evidence to the proper authorities for prosecution. The committee or subcommittee shall make a final report of its investigation, with recommendations, to the Senate not later than December 15, 1932. For the purposes of this resolution the committee or subcommittee is authorized to avail itself of the services of all agencies of the Federal and District Governments...
Page 83 - SEPTEMBER 9, 1932 UNITED STATES SENATE, SUBCOMMITTEE OF THE COMMITTEE OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, Washington, DC The subcommittee met, pursuant to call, at 2.30 o'clock pm, in the committee room, Capitol Building, Hon.
Page 110 - Whv do you not give the true facts? Mr. LINKINS. Well, I will, if better questions are asked, or if you want me to give the additional information. There are lots of things here, just as Mr. Hagner said, that have not anything more to do with this case than the flowers that bloom in the spring. Senator COPELAND. We might be different kind of florists. Mr. LINKINS, That is true. But at the same time they have not any bearing on it. But the very thing the resolution charges, there is no question to...
Page 26 - Therefore be it Resolved, That the Committee on the District of Columbia, or a duly authorized subcommittee thereof, is hereby authorized and directed to make a full and complete investigation in respect to the several matters hereinbefore set...
Page 69 - ... COPELAND. How soon are we going to have this first transscript? Is it to be printed promptly? Senator CAPPER. Yes. Senator COPELAND. Then, I would like to have this typewritten statement inserted in the record. (The statement referred to is as follows :) BETTER CITIZENS BUREAU, Washington, July %7, 19S2. Mr. Chairman, gentlemen of the committee, my name is Roy A. Ellis, and I am executive secretary of the Better Citizens Bureau, which maintains its headquarters here in the city of Washington,...
Page 71 - ... toilet facilities? Mr. ELLIS. No; in the backyard. Senator COPELAND. Is that universal? Mr. ELLIS. Yes. Senator COPELAND. How may people live in that Navy Place? Mr. ELLIS. About an average of four to a family. Of course some families are larger. I should say 200 or 250 people easily. Dixon Court in the southwest affords a very interesting yet vicious state of affairs. A dealer by the name of Quick has established a scheme of renting these alley shacks by the room and collecting the rent each...
Page 159 - Mrs. LEVY. Senator, I should like to make a statement, if I may be permitted to do so. Senator COPELAND. You may give your name to the committee and proceed. Mrs. LEVY. My name is Mrs. George Levy. I should like to know if certain propaganda that is being spread through the Government departments are connected in any way with our real-estate men in Washington or is that a private concern of the Government? I understand that in several...
Page 160 - Mr. BOWIE. This is the first case of a refusal to give you information. Mr. BRINKMAN. I beg your pardon, yours was the first case. You have refused to give the information that we asked for two and onehalf months ago. Mr. BOWIE. I have given it to you. Mr. BRINKMAN. It is still to come in to me. Mr. SAVAGE. I do not want to be misunderstood. I have not refused to give information. Senator COPELAND. Mr. Savage, if you will take my advice you will give the information. Pass that on to your lawyer as...

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