Report from the Select Committee of the Legislative Council of Upper Canada: On the Report of the Right Honourable the Earl of Durham, Her Majesty's Late Governor-in-chief of British North America

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R. Stanton, 1839 - Ontario - 25 pages
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Page 8 - A Report from the Legislative Council of Upper Canada states, — ' After an attentive and disinterested consideration of this subject, your committee are led to the conclusion, that the adoption of the plan proposed by the Earl of Durham must lead to the overthrow of the great colonial empire of England.
Page 6 - ... it is not to be wondered at that he should, in many cases, give the preference to the land in which he is treated most as a citizen. It is very possible that there are but few cases in which the departure of an Englishman from Upper Canada to the States can be traced directly to any of these circumstances in particular...
Page 24 - Committee having animadverted on the principal topics in the report of the High Commissioner, beg, ere they conclude, to observe that, as regards Upper Canada, Lord Durham could not possibly have any personal knowledge, the period of his sojourn in that Province being of such very short duration. — Your Committee regret that His Lordship should have confided the task of collecting information to a person, who, be he whom he may, has evidently entered on his task, with the desire to exalt the opponents...
Page 14 - ... the consistency of politicians. The same course of politics is found in the United States, where the President, the Senate, and the House of Representatives constantly find their measures negatived by each other, and where members are constantly instructed by their constituents, according to the popular whim of the hour. We therefore do not find what is strictly called Executive responsibility, or necessity of continual accordance of government with the popular voice ; and measures have, even...
Page 11 - Either this must be the course pursued by a Governor, with responsible advisers, or he must think for himself, independently of those advisers: and, as a matter of course, throw himself for information and advice, upon irregular and unknown sources. In such an event, the responsible advisers resign — they have, perhaps, a majority in the Provincial Parliament; but they may, notwithstanding, be very wrong. Then comes a dissolution of the Provincial Parliament, and, perhaps, an expression of public...
Page 12 - If England withdraw her influence, and leave her governors to be the shuttle between colonial parties, no loyalty now existing among any of these parties will prevent their seeking another influence in the neighbouring republic, to replace the one needlessly withdrawn; and as the French of Lower Canada sought the alliance of their ancient enemies, the Anglo-American population of the neighbouring States, to give them the means of overwhelming the British population — for the time left without the...
Page 7 - Government," your Committee beg to observe, that a liberal minded Englishman, sincerely admiring the great principles of the British Constitution, would naturally be desirous of extending them, theoretically and practically, to all people living under the dominion of the Crown ; and at the first view, would be apt to ascribe any evils which were found to exist in any portion of the Empire, to the absence of those political institutions, which he is bound to uphold in the administration of public...
Page 22 - Is it because reformers, or a portion of them, can command the sympathies of the United States, and of Lower Canadian rebels, that the internal affairs of a British colony must be conducted so as to please them? Where would the colonial government have looked for support and defence .in its time of real danger, had proscription, and discouragement, and disregard, been the portion of those who had shown, at the elections, that they were willing to sacrifice a portion of popular influence, to the great...
Page 16 - This, or something approaching to it, not being an unusual condition of politics, it may easily be supposed that few, if any persons, possess sufficient influence to conduct affairs ; and from this state of things, it is to be presumed, has arisen the practice in all colonial governments with legislatures, of the governors standing as mediators between parties, yielding and leaning to the popular voice, but resisting it with the authority of their office, when it was manifestly in error. It must...
Page 25 - British connection — that he should, in such an attempt have laid himself open to severe censure, was to be expected. Your Committee have, however, through a feeling of respect for Her Majesty's Commissioner, refrained from commenting on his Report, in the terms which they honestly avow they think it merits, confident that their forbearance will meet the desires of your Honourable House, and be equally in accordance with the wishes of the family compact hereinbefore mentioned All which is respectfully...

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