Report of the Committee of the Senate Upon the Relations Between Labor and Capital, and Testimony Taken by the Committee, Volume 3

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Page 10 - I do not think that it is an exaggeration to say that you may often see on the sidewalks here in the evening thousands who have come out under those circumstances.
Page 702 - Imports continually increase as the export of our excess enables us to pay for them, and "the ships that pass between this land and that, are like the shuttle of the loom, weaving the web of concord among the nations.
Page 512 - Schooi, oeru, so we built a school inside the works and made it compulsory on every apprentice to attend that school during the evening two hours in the week. If they do not attend that school they are discharged from our employment ; and this applies to all our apprentices. Trade Unions. I am happy to say that trades unions with us have become part and parcel of our life. We have accepted them now as one of the proper societies for the working classes to form, and, conducted as they are by able...
Page 452 - And another thing that helped to keep me down: A year ago this month I buried the oldest boy we had, and that brings things very expensive on a poor man. For instance, it will cost there, to bury a body, about $100. Now, we could have that done in England for about 5; that would not amount to much more than about $20, or something in that neighborhood. That makes a good deal of difference. Doctors...
Page 452 - How much money have you had within three months? — A. I have had about $16 inside of three months. Q. Is that all you have had within the last three months to live on?— A. Yes; $16. SUPPORTING A FAMILY ON $133 A YEAR. Q. How much have you had within a year? — A. Since Thanksgiving I happened to get work in the Crescent Mill, and worked there exactly thirteen weeks. I got just $1.50 a day, with the exception of a few days that I lost — because in following up mulespinning you are obliged to...
Page 452 - He works in the ironworks at Fall River. He only works about nine months out of twelve. There is generally about three months of stoppage, taking the year right through, and his wife and his family all have to be supported for a year out of the wages of nine months— $1.50 a day for nine months out of the twelve, to support six of them. It does not stand to reason that those children and he himself can have natural food or be naturally dressed."40 Speaking of the industrial population of Fall River,...
Page 510 - We find these boys are more capable of understanding the oral teaching and they understand better what they read. Their minds are made more reflective and receptive by the fact that they have depended more upon themselves, and put into operation the knowledge' that they have before acquired in the schools.
Page 456 - ... have a poor show. We are all, or mostly all, in good health; that is, as far as the men who are at work go. Q. You do not know anything but mule-spinning, I suppose?— A. That is what I have been doing, but I sometimes do something with pick and shovel. I have worked for a man at that, because I am so put on. I am looking for work in a mill. The way they do there is this: There are about twelve or thirteen men that go into a mill every morning, and they have to stand their chance, looking for...
Page 452 - I have a brother who has four children, besides his wife and himself. All he earns is $1.50 a day. He works in the iron works at Fall River. He only works about nine months out of twelve. There is generally about three months of stoppage, taking the year right through, and his wife and his family all have to be supported for a year out of the wages of nine months — $1.50 a day for nine months out of the twelve, to support six of...

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