Report of the President of Harvard College and Reports of Departments

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1872
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Page 51 - In addition to the exercises given in the tables, examinations in writing, of three hours each, were required in every study at the end of the year, or at the end of the half-year in studies pursued only during the first half-year.
Page 77 - That they will establish there a course of instruction in practical agriculture, in useful and ornamental gardening, in botany, and in such other branches of natural science, as may tend to promote a knowledge of practical agriculture and the various arts subservient thereto, and connected therewith, and cause such courses of lectures to be delivered there, at such seasons of the year, and under such regulations as they may think best adapted to promote the ends designed; and also to furnish gratuitous...
Page 64 - Hall, and received a trifling compensation in addition to his room rent and tuition. It was not any part of his duty to spend any of his time in the library; still less to exercise any authority or supervision over those who used it. The janitor had certain duties to perform in reference to the library; but it was not his business to exercise any authority or supervision over those who used it, nor was he expected to remain in it, except when certain specific duties required his presence. In fact,...
Page 94 - At a Meeting of the President and Fellows of Harvard College in Boston, March ША, 1877.
Page 95 - I bequeath to the President and Fellows of Harvard College one thousand dollars in trust, for an annual prize to the best dissertation by any student of the College, or any of its schools, undergraduate or graduate, on Universal Peace and the methods by which war may be permanently superseded. I do this in the hope of drawing the attention of students to the practicability of organizing peace among nations which I sincerely believe may be done. I cannot doubt that the same modes of decision which...
Page 48 - Bad spelling, incorrectness as well as inelegance of expression in writing, ignorance of the simplest rules of punctuation, and almost entire want of familiarity with English literature, are far from rare among young men of eighteen otherwise well prepared to pursue their college studies.
Page 7 - September 27, 1875. JOSEPH P. OLIVER, to be Clinical Teacher of Diseases of Children, September 27, 1875. SAMUEL S. WEBBER, to be Clinical Teacher of Diseases of the Nervous System, September 27, 1875. JAMES J. PUTNAM, to be Clinical Teacher of Diseases of the Nervous System, September 27, 1875. WILLIAM GRAY, HENRY J. BIGELOW, and THOMAS G. APPLETON, to be Trustees of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts for one year, from March 1, 1875, March 18, 1875. The average age of the young men admitted to Harvard...
Page 50 - ... ought to possess. Co-operation on the part of the leading colleges is much needed in enforcing upon teachers, and in enabling them to enforce upon their pupils, the necessity of thorough training in all the elements of a sound education. As soon as those colleges unite in demanding of candidates for admission a thoroughly good training in English no less than in classical subjects, the schools which feed the colleges will in turn be able to exact from the lower schools an efficiency which they...
Page 50 - ... less than in classical subjects, the schools which feed the colleges will in turn be able to exact from the lower schools an efficiency which they now greatly lack. The service •which American colleges could thus indirectly render to American education it is difficult to overestimate. Were a good degree of proficiency in a well-constructed course of English studies strictly enforced as a condition of admission into our leading colleges, the quality of education received by all pupils in all...
Page 13 - Twelve students were in attendance upon the courses, 4 of whom presented themselves for examination on the course in philosophy. In his report for 1871-72 President Eliot says: "The university lectures have now been tried for nine years. Although some temporary advantages and certain improvements have resulted from them, it must be confessed that they have distinctly failed as a scheme for giving advanced instruction in philosophy, history, and the humanities, and that they have failed hopelessly...

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