Report of the Commissioners: Evidences and Proceedings. v. 1-4

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L. M'Dermott, 1871 - Foreign workers
 

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Page 353 - I, N., take thee, M., to my wedded husband, to have and to hold from this day forward, for better, for worse, for richer, for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and to cherish, till death us do part, according to God's holy ordinance; and thereto I give thee my troth.
Page 183 - I conceive," says Mr. Brumell, " that there can be no strict enforcement of a contract between two parties, one of whom is known and responsible, and the other unknown and possessing only a cloth round his loins. The first intimation a planter receives of a breach of contract is the absence of the labourer ; and when (if ever) he hears of him again, it is that he is in another district or county." Situated as the proprietors are, therefore, they are obliged to wink at the behaviour of their people,...
Page 125 - On complaint referred, and proof made before any stipendiary magistrate, that any servant has neglected to perform his stipulated work, or that he has performed it negligently or improperly, or that by negligence or other improper conduct he has injured the property of his master entrusted to his care, the magistrate may, in his discretion, adjudge the servant...
Page 115 - Be it therefore enacted by his excellency the governor of the colony of British Guiana, with the advice and consent of the court of policy thereof and of the financial representatives of the inhabitants of the said colony in combined court assembled, as follows: 1. There shall be...
Page 123 - ... thereof, the magistrate shall and may issue a warrant for the seizure and sale of the goods of the master, or so much thereof as may be requisite for making such compensation; and failing any sufficient distress, the magistrate shall and may make order for the commitment of the master to prison, for any time not exceeding one month, unless compensation be sooner made. The...
Page 159 - Opium-smoking is carried on by some to great excess, and it is not uncommon to see many of them quite emaciated and almost unfit for work from excessive use of this drug. We have occasionally seen Chinese in estates' hospitals who have been there for years from some chronic disease, and whom the employer has not only to feed, but supply with opium, the stoppage of which would cause their death. The wretched appearance of some of the votaries of this habit has more than once misled strangers into...
Page 127 - ... to attend during any time not exceeding, if he shall be employed in the field, seven hours between sunrise and sunset, and if he shall be employed within the buildings of the plantation or estate, ten hours, between the hours of five in the morning and eight in the evening...
Page 1 - Governor and Commanderin-Chief in and over the Colony of British Guiana, Vice- Admiral and Ordinary of the same, &c. &c. &c., by and with the Advice and Consent of the Honourable the Court of Policy of said Colony.
Page 93 - As to the Indian Coolie the Commissioners say : — " A more serious matter is the statement of wages, inserted in the certificate, without note or comment, but required by the Indian Act to be specified as that ' agreed upon between the immigrants and the recruiter.' The rate is entered as from ten annas to two rupees, no difference being made in this particular between the certificates given to males and females ; we shall hereafter examine into the rates of wages really earned, and show plainly...
Page 159 - Indian or the Negro, and is much quicker at learning to manage machinery than either of them. He is also very careful and neat in his work in the field or buildings ; is much more independent than the Coolie, and not so easily led away by discontented persons; rarely making a frivolous complaint, though when he does make one that is false ; it is much more difficult to convict him of lying, from the extreme ingenuity with which he gets up his case and instructs his witnesses. Possessing a keen sense...

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