Report on the Ship-building Industry of the United States

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1884 - Shipbuilding - 276 pages
 

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This book is great, but this scan of it is missing pages. I know for a fact that pages 8 and 9 are missing.

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Page 47 - Peters, being a man of very public spirit and singular activity for all occasions, procured some to join for building a ship at Salem of 300 tons, and the inhabitants of Boston stirred up by his example, set upon the building another at Boston of 150 tons. The work was hard to accomplish for want of money &c. but our shipwrights were content to take such pay as the country could make. The shipwright at Salem, thro...
Page 68 - That the happiest effects have resulted from the experiments tried in the American navy and merchant service to do without spirituous liquors as an habitual article of daily use; there being at present more than 1,000 sail of American vessels traversing all the seas of the world, in every climate, without the use of spirits by their officers or crews, and being, in consequence of this change, in so much greater a state of efficiency and safety than other vessels not adopting this regulation...
Page 48 - Of all the American plantations, his Majesty has none so apt for the building of shipping as...
Page 34 - Their fishing is much in Boats. These they make of one tree by burning and scratching away the coales with stones and shels, till they have made it in forme of a Trough. Some of them are an elne deepe...
Page 147 - Forbes, a large screw ocean tug of 329 gross tons, for the use of the underwriters of this port. This vessel was constructed by Otis Tufts and finished in 1845. It was supplied with twin screw propellers of Ericsson design, especially adapted for outside work in rough water, and lived long enough to be bought by the Government during the Rebellion and to take part in the capture of Port Royal. There was a small iron paddle-wheel steamer constructed in East Boston about 1857, called the Argentina,...
Page 28 - Chesnut) he made him a little House or shed of the bark of it, he puts fire and followes the burning of it with fire, in the midst in many places: his...
Page 68 - ... crews, and being, in consequence of this change, in so much greater a state of efficiency and safety than other vessels not adopting this regulation, that the public insurance companies in America make a return of five per cent, of the premium of insurance on vessels completing their voyages without the use of spirits, while the examples of British ships sailing from Liverpool on the same plan have been productive of the greatest benefit to the ship owners, underwriters, merchants, officers,...
Page 47 - ... commodities, now our money was gone, and that things were like to go well in England, set us on work to provide shipping of our own, for which end Mr.
Page 63 - ... went out of vogue, and vessels became longer in proportion to beam. The round bottoms were much in use, but the tendency toward a straight rise of the floor from the keel to a point half-way to the outer width of the ship became marked and popular. Hollow water-lines fore and aft were introduced; the forefoot of the hull ceased to be cut away so much, and the swell of the sides became less marked; the bows became somewhat sharper and were often made flaring above the water, and...
Page 34 - Some of them are an elne deepe, and 40 or 50 foot in length, and some will beare 40 men, but the most ordinary are smaller and will beare 10, 20, or 30. according to their bignes.

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