Report Upon a Projected Improvement of the Estate of the College of California, at Berkeley, Near Oakland

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W. C. Bryant, 1866 - 26 pages
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Page 7 - GOD ALMIGHTY first planted a garden. And indeed it is the purest of human pleasures. It is the greatest refreshment to the spirits of man; without which buildings and palaces are but gross...
Page 7 - God Almighty first planted a garden; and, indeed, it is the purest of human pleasures. It is the greatest refreshment to the spirits of man; without which buildings and palaces are but gross handiworks...
Page 21 - ... vicinity, and a considerable number of old and somewhat quaint and picturesque oaks are growing in a portion of it. This occurrence, with a thick growth of underwood and of rank, herbaceous plants, leads me to think that if it were thoroughly drained, cleaned, and tilled, trees would naturally grow upon it in more umbrageous and elegant forms than elsewhere, and that turf could be more easily formed and maintained upon its surface. I recommend that it should be surrounded by a thick plantation...
Page 21 - ... than might be supposed from the drawing. The road is designed to be laid out in such a way as to make the most of the natural features, while preserving their completely sylvan and rural character, being carried with frequent curves in such a way as to make the best use of the picturesque banks of the arroyas and the existing trees upon them.
Page 21 - ... would be able to acquire possession of this land if desirable. The extent of the sylvan lanes which I have described, exclusive of the village streets, the avenue to the bay shore, and the road into the mountain gorge, would be about five miles. At several points upon them there would be very fine distant views, each having some distinctive advantage. The local scenery would also at many points be not only quite interesting, even without any effort to produce special effects by planting, but...
Page 4 - ... middle ages and the barrenness of monastic study in the present day, is too apparent to be disregarded. Scholars should be prepared to lead, not to follow reluctantly after, the advancing line of civilization. To be qualified as leaders they must have an intelligent appreciation of and sympathy with the real life of civilization, and this can only be acquired through a familiarity with the higher and more characteristic forms in which it is developed. For this reason it is desirable that scholars,...
Page 13 - ... if possible, where the other two are found ready to hand. For the purpose of ascertaining what was necessary to be supplied upon your ground to give it the advantages which have been described, and others, generally recognized to be essential to a neighborhood of the best form of civilized homes, I visited it under a variety of circumstances, in summer and winter, by night and by day, and I now propose to state what are its natural conditions, what are the artificial conditions required, and...
Page 21 - ... supposed from the drawing. The road is designed to be laid out in such a way as to make the most of the natural features, while preserving their completely sylvan and rural ; character, being carried with frequent curves in such a way as to make the best use of the picturesque banks of the arroyos and the existing trees upon them. These are sometimes allowed to divide it into two parts. Notwithstanding the varied curves which the arrangement involves, the general course of the lanes will be found...
Page 7 - Attractive of en-air apartments, so formed that they can be often occupied for hours at a time, with convenience and ease in every respect, without the interruption of ordinary occupations or difficulty of conversation...
Page 15 - ... is absolutely complete and constant, I think that I am warranted in endorsing the opinion that the climate of Berkeley is distinguished for a peculiar serenity, cheerfulness and healthfulness. I know of no entirely satisfactory explanation of the fact. But it may be observed that it lies to the northward of the course of the northwest wind which draws through the Golden Gate and which sweeps the peninsula to the southward of the city and the Contra Costa country south...

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