Reports of the Secretary of the Treasury of the United States...[1790-1828].

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1828
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Page 287 - In obedience to the directions of the " Act supplementary to the Act to establish the Treasury Department," the Secretary of the Treasury respectfully submits the following report : 1st.
Page 112 - It is, therefore, of necessity, left to the discretion of the National Legislature, to pronounce, upon the objects which concern the general welfare, and for which, under that description, an appropriation of money is requisite and proper.
Page 426 - That the President of the United States, be, and he hereby is authorized, in case either France or Great Britain shall so revoke or modify her edicts, as that they shall cease to violate the neutral commerce of the United States...
Page 112 - These three qualifications excepted, the power to raise money is plenary and indefinite, and the objects to which it may be appropriated, are no less comprehensive than the payment of the public debts, and the providing for the common defence and general welfare. The terms "general welfare...
Page 132 - In countries where there is great private wealth, much may be effected by the voluntary contributions of patriotic individuals ; but in a community situated like that of the United States, the public purse must supply the deficiency of private resource. In what can it be so useful, as in prompting and improving the efforts of industry?
Page 113 - The only qualification of the generality of the phrase in question, which seems to be admissible, is this: That the object, to which an appropriation of money is to be made, be general, and not local; its operation extending, in fact, or by possibility, throughout the Union, and not being confined to a particular spot.
Page 106 - Not only the wealth, but the independence and security of a country, appear to be materially connected with the prosperity of manufactures. Every nation, with a view to those great objects, ought to endeavor to possess within itself all the essentials of national supply.
Page 93 - To produce the desirable changes as early as may be expedient may therefore require the incitement and patronage of government.
Page 5 - To justify and preserve their confidence; to promote the increasing respectability of the American name; to answer the calls of justice; to restore landed property to its due value; to furnish new resources both to agriculture and commerce; to cement more closely the union of the States; to add to their security against foreign attack; to establish public order on the basis of an upright and liberal policy — these are the great and invaluable ends to be secured by a proper and adequate provision...
Page 10 - A wise nation will never permit those who relieve the wants of their country, or who rely most on its faith, its firmness, and its resources, when either of them is distrusted, to suffer by the event.

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