Representation

Front Cover
James Roland Pennock, John William Chapman
Transaction Publishers, 1968 - Political Science - 317 pages
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This volume, offers the thought of twenty scholars on the theory, history, and practice of representation. Two developments make a new appraisal of this subject timely. One is the decision of the United States Supreme Court requiring representation to be democratic in the sense of affording every voter an equal voice in government. The other, that some governments that are not democratic in the sense of having freely competitive political parties are now nevertheless "representative." A number of essays in this volume deal with the problems of equitable apportionment of representation from the point of view of constitutional law, normative theory, and practical politics. Two take up the proposal of weighted voting as a means for meeting the Supreme Court's objectives, and two others inquire into the meaning of representation under noncompetitive party systems. Combining an overview of the subject with a detailed analysis of its various aspects, this book presents information of major significance for all engaged in the study of political processes, comparative politics, constitutional law, political theory, and legislative behavior. The general reader of politics and political and legal philosophy will find here a clear vision and explication of the theoretical and practical background and the underpinnings of representative government. J. Roland Pennock was professor of political science at Swarthmore College for more than twenty-five years, as well as a fellow at the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. John W. Chapman is professor emeritus of political science at the University of Pittsburgh.

 

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