Representations: Images of the World in Ciceronian Oratory

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University of California Press, Nov 17, 1993 - Literary Criticism - 301 pages
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Ann Vasaly introduces representation theory into the study of Ciceronian persuasion and contends that an understanding of milieu—social, political, topographical—is crucial to understanding Ciceronian oratory. As a genre uniquely dependent on an immediate interaction between author and audience, ancient oratory becomes performance art.

Vasaly investigates the way Cicero represented the contemporary physical world—places, topography, and monuments, both those seen and those merely mentioned—to his listeners and demonstrates how he used these representations to persuade. Her exceptionally well-written study deftly recaptures the immediacy of Cicero's oratory and makes a trenchant contribution to an important new area of inquiry in Classical Studies.
 

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Contents

Ambiance Rhetoric and the Meaning of Things
15
Transforming the Visible In Catilinam 1 and 3
40
Signa and Signifiers A World Created
88
Ethos and Locus Ancient Perspectives
131
Place and Commonplace Country and City
156
Ethnic Personae
191
Conclusion
245
Abbreviations
259
Bibliography
261
General Index
277
Index of Ancient Authors
289
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About the author (1993)

Ann Vasaly is Assistant Professor of Classical Studies at Boston University.

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