Representative Essays

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George Haven Putnam
G. P. Putnam's sons, 1908 - English essays - 395 pages
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Page 289 - High instincts, before which our mortal nature Doth tremble like a guilty thing surprised." There will remain " Those first affections, Those shadowy recollections, Which, be they what they may, Are yet the fountain-light of all our day,— Are yet the master-light of all our seeing,— Uphold us, cherish, and have power to
Page 118 - and known in the world current everywhere ; to make all men live in an atmosphere of sweetness and light, where they may use ideas, as it uses them itself, freely, — nourished, and not bound by them. This is the social idea ; and the men of culture are the
Page 118 - with ready-made judgments and watchwords. It seeks to do away with classes ; to make the best that has been taught and known in the world current everywhere ; to make all men live in an atmosphere of sweetness and light, where they may use ideas, as it uses them itself, freely, — nourished, and not bound by them.
Page 117 - condemn neither way ; but culture works differently. It does not try to teach down to the level of inferior classes ; it does not try to win them for this or that sect of its own, with ready-made judgments and watchwords. It seeks to do away with classes ; to make the best that has been
Page 72 - The human soul is true to these facts in the painting of fable, of history, of law, of proverbs, of conversation. It finds a tongue in literature unawares. Thus the Greeks called Jupiter, Supreme Mind ; but having traditionally ascribed to him many base actions, they involuntarily made amends to reason, by tying
Page 7 - brought to an excellent passe, notwithstanding that it never came unto the type of perfection until the time of Queen Elizabeth, wherein John Jewell, Bishop of Sarum, John Fox, and sundrie learned and excellent writers, have fully accomplished the ornature of the same, to their great praise and immortal commendation.
Page 78 - to a common want. It is best to pay in your land a skilful gardener, or to buy good-sense applied to gardening ; in your sailor, goodsense applied to navigation ; in the house, good-sense applied to cooking, sewing, serving; in your agent, good-sense applied to accounts and affairs. So do you multiply your presence, or spread yourself throughout your estate.
Page 105 - itself on all sides, and aspiring with all its organs after sweetness, light, and perfection ! Another newspaper, representing, like the Nonconformist, one of the religious organizations of this country, was a short time ago giving an account of the crowd at Epsom on the Derby day, and of all the vice and hideousness which
Page 75 - and it shall be given you. — He that watereth shall be watered himself. — What will you have? quoth God; pay for it and take it. — Nothing venture, nothing have. — Thou shalt be paid exactly for what thou hast done, no more, no less. — Who doth not work shall not eat. — Harm watch, harm catch. — Curses always recoil on the head of him

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