Researches Among the Cyclades

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1884 - Cyclades (Greece) - 18 pages
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Page 13 - ... presume that many of them were turned on a potter's wheel. There is no trace however of a pattern from animal or vegetable life on these vases, all being herring or criss cross : this would place our pottery anterior to that of FIG. 10. Hissarlik, on which we see attempts at the representations of eyes, noses, and breasts. The clay is very poor and very slightly baked ; much of it is black inside, as if the pots had been dried in a closed place, so that the smoke has penetrated the clay. Then...
Page 7 - ... the top and sometimes at the bottom of the grave. They were on an average three feet long, two feet wide, and seldom more than two feet deep. In every grave here we found bones, chiefly heaped together in confusion, and most of them contained the bones of more bodies than one. In one very small grave we found two skulls so tightly wedged together between the side slabs that they could not be removed without smashing them. From this we may argue that the flesh had been removed in some way before...
Page 17 - The ekull from the Greek tombs at Antiparos placed in my hands for examination by Mr. Bent is that of an adult male of middle age. In general appearance it is of rounded form, broad in proportion to its length, and particularly deep from above downwards at the posterior or occipital region. This gives it a peculiarly massive look, and is due to the rapidity with which the posterior part curves downwards towards the foramen таг/пит from the middle parietal region.
Page 11 - In the poorer graves in the first cemetery there was not a trace of volcanic glass implements, whilst in the richer ones, obsidian flakes or knives were very common, but here again I found no arrow heads, which occur in great quantities in other places •where obsidian implements are found in Greece. Here in Antiparos the inhabitants had their obsidian close at hand, for a hill about a mile from the south-eastern graveyard is covered with it. I take it that the graves must date from the very first...
Page 12 - The art of making them has perished, but the theory is plain : any maker of gun-Hints could do it. The Indians still have a plan of working obsidian, by laying a bone wedge on the surface of a core, and tapping it till the stone cracks, and their productions are the same as these specimens from Antiparos.
Page 8 - Paros was a great centre for settlements in all ages from various nations and languages, owing to the marble quarries, but Antiparos had the advantage over Paros for excavating, owing to the non-existence of historic remains, so that we could start with a fair supposition that the extensive graveyards belonged to a period prior to history. During my stay at Antiparos I was assisted in everything by the kindness of my friends the Messrs. Swan, who conducted the calamine mines on the island, and with...
Page 16 - Nothing can be decided without the aid of geology as to the dates of these graves, and with the aid of geology something might possibly be done, and it would turn on two points. Firstly as to the time of the submersion of the houses at Antiparos by the encroachment of the sea, which has evidently been brought about by the wearing through of the narrow slip of land between Antiparos and Despotico, and secondly, as to the date of the first great convulsion of nature, which changed Santorin from a lovely...
Page 4 - From these facts it will be obvious that the islands of the Aegaean Sea, especially the smaller ones, offer unusual facilities for the study of the manners and customs of the Greeks as they are. Here many characteristics exist which are obsolete on the mainland, and not a few of those customs which...
Page 12 - ... found a considerable number of metal ornaments in the graves at Antiparos. I have in my possession a narrow twisted tore of silver, with a large percentage of copper; rings of silver with the same oxide as on certain rings found in Etruria, which oxide cuts like horn ; a band of bronze with about 75 per cent, of copper in it, and covered with an incrustation of red oxide and green carbonate of copper; and that little silver figure I mentioned above, thus giving us silver, copper, and bronze in...
Page 18 - The parietal tubera are well marked, the mesial frontal suture is persistent, and the glabella is fairly prominent. Comparing this skull with the other Greek skulls in the College of Surgeons...

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