Resolving Identity-Based Conflict In Nations, Organizations, and Communities

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Wiley, Jun 5, 1997 - Business & Economics - 224 pages
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Conflict can either destroy or create—depAnding on whether and how it is guided. This is the simple yet profound insight that underlies Jay Rothman's innovative new framework for understanding and transforming identity-based conflict in nations, organizations, and communities. Reading a newspaper, working in an organization, or sitting in on a town meeting can provide vivid examples of identity conflicts in action. Based in the national, organizational, and community groups that provide individuals with meaning, safety, and dignity, identity conflicts are passionate and volatile because they strike at our core: who we really are and what we care about most deeply. Though often impervious to traditional methods of conflict management, identity-based conflict also provides adversaries with dynamic opportunities for finding not only common ground, but higher ground than separate parties could have found on their own. Grounded in his grassroots conflict resolution work in the Middle East — work that earned him the honor of witnessing the historic White House handshake between Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and PLO President Yasser Arafat — and brilliantly refined to address a wide range of organizational and community conflicts, Rothman's ARIA model is a versatile and innovative synthesis of the best contemporary ideas in conflict management, resolution, and transformation. Step by step, Resolving Identity-Based Conflict traces the ARIA journey through Antagonism, Resonance, Invention, and Action in a variety of environments. In straightforward, jargon-free language, Rothman conveys solid theoretical insights and practical how-to's that allow researchers and practitioners to:
  • Recognize the crucial differences between identity- and resource-based conflicts
  • Zero in on the needs and motivations shared by even the bitterest of adversaries
  • Create joint agendas for groups in conflict
  • Transform intragroup and intergroup conflicts in organizations of every k

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Contents

The ARIA Quartet Conflict
1
Surfacing Differences
21
Articulating Common Needs
33
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

JAY ROTHMAN Ph.D., is a conflict resolution theorist and practitioner with twenty years of experience. As a facilitator, consultant, trainer, and educator, he has worked with diplomats from dozens of countries, business executives, union leaders, opposing leaders of embattled ethnic groups, school boards and superintAndents, community activists, and students from around the world. He is currently a visiting scholar and associate professor at the masters of arts program in conflict resolution at Antioch University. The author lives near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

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