Restructuring Networks in Post-socialism: Legacies, Linkages, and Localities

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Oxford University Press, 1997 - Business & Economics - 349 pages
This book is about change in Central and Eastern Europe, and about how we think about social and economic change more generally. In contrast to the dominant 'transition framework' that examines organizational forms in Eastern Europe according to the degree to which they conform to, or depart from, the blueprints of already existing capitalist systems, this book examines the innovative character, born of necessity, in which actors in the post-socialist setting are restructuring organizations and institutions by redefining and recombining resources. Instead of thinking of these recombinations as accidental aberrations, the book explores their evolutionary potentials.

The starting premise of Restructuring Networks in Post-Socialist Societies is that the actual unit of entrepreneurship is not the isolated individual personality but the social network that links firms and the actors within them. Drawing insight from evolutionary economics and from the new methods of network analysis, leading sociologists, economists, and political scientists report on changes in organizational forms in Hungary, Poland, Eastern Germany, Russia, and the Czech Republic.
 

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Contents

Recombinant Property in East European Capitalism
35
The limits of Privatization
70
Adaptation at the Cost of Adaptability? Restructuring
107
NEW FIRM FORMATION
135
Small Entrepreneurship
158
Towards Industrial Districts? SmallFirm Networking
176
Regional and local Factors in the Restructuring
190
Transformation of the Czech Republic
209
The Social and Cultural Embeddedness of Entrepreneurs
242
The Antinomies of Privatization in Eastern Europe
265
Privatization by Means of State Bureaucracy? The Treuhand
284
local
324
Index
343
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Gernot Grabher is a Lecturer in Economic Geography. David Stark is a Professor, Cornell University and Center for Advanced Studies in Behavioural Sciences at Stanford University.

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