Rethinking Management Information Systems: An Interdisciplinary Perspective

Front Cover
Wendy Currie, Bob Galliers
OUP Oxford, Apr 8, 1999 - Business & Economics - 528 pages
This book examines influential ideas within Management Information Systems (MIS). Leading international contributors summarize key topics and explore a variety of issues currently being discussed in the field. They re-visit influential ideas such as socio-technical theory, systems thinking, and structuration theory and demonstrate their relevance to newer ideas such as re-engineering, hybrid management, knowledge workers, and outsourcing. In locating MIS within an interdisciplinary context, particularly in the light of rapid technological changes, this book will form the link between past and future approaches to MIS.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

THEORY

Contents

Introduction
3
Systems Thinking
45
Research on Information Systems Development
57
Structuration Theory
103
A Theory of Information Systems Based on Improvisation
136
Information Systems Strategic Management
157
What Happens if the IS Field
175
Costs and Risks
204
changing dynamics of practice
287
A Historical Analysis of Implementing IS at J Lyons
310
What Problems
326
A Critical
361
Introduction
391
An Example of Tunnel Vision
417
Rethinking Capabilities and Skills in the Information
444
The Management of Knowledge Workers
474

Lessons
229
Introduction
247
Not the Choice
279
workers
483
Postscript
497
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 12 - There is not a single major thesis advanced by either nineteenthcentury Positivists or the Vienna Circle that has not been devastatingly criticized when measured by the Positivists' own standards for philosophical argument. The original formulations of the analytic-synthetic dichotomy and the verifiability criterion of meaning have been abandoned. It has been effectively shown that the Positivists' understanding of the natural sciences and the formal disciplines is grossly oversimplified.
Page 10 - The popular mind conceives of all these sub-worlds more or less disconnectedly; and, when dealing with one of them, forgets for the time being its relations to the rest. The complete philosopher is he who seeks not only to assign to every given object of his thought its right place in one or other of these sub-worlds, but he also seeks to determine the relation of each sub-world to the others in the total world which is.
Page 10 - Consequently, there exist several, probably an infinite number of various orders of reality, each with its own special and separate style of existence, called by James 'sub-universes'.
Page 10 - Each world whilst it is attended to is real after its own fashion ; only the reality lapses with the attention.

Bibliographic information