Rethinking Organizational and Managerial Communication from Feminist Perspectives

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SAGE, Apr 19, 2000 - Business & Economics - 328 pages
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This book reconsiders organizational and managerial communication theories, research, and practice from a feminist standpoint. It looks at theoretical analyses that reconceptualize and extend boundaries in our thinking about work and organizing processes; presents women's voices through interview excerpts, poems, diary entries, and stories and explores the ways in which these concrete details of ordinary lives represent missing facets of our organizational and managerial communication work; and contains chapters that rewrite organizational and managerial constructs.
 

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Contents

A Feminist Standpoint Approach
47
Feminist Views of Communication
76
A Feminist Critique of Disciplined Bodies
107
Leadership Theorizing Daily Acts
128
Roses Story
157
Learning the Ropes A Black Feminist Standpoint Analysis
177
The Promise and Practice of the New Career and Social
209
l0 Chaos Theory and the Glass Ceiling
236
Dialoguing
257
References
265
Index
305
About the Contributors
323
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About the author (2000)

Patrice M. Buzzanell (Ph.D., Purdue University) returned to her alma mater as a professor in the Department of Communication at Purdue University where she earned her Ph.D. in organizational communication. Her research interests center on feminist organizational communication theorizing and the construction of gendered workplace identities, interactions, and structures, particularly as they relate to career processes and outcomes. She has published in Human Communication Research, Communication Monographs, Journal of Applied Communication Research, and other communication journals and edited books. For her edited book, Rethinking Organizational and Managerial Communication from Feminist Perspectives (SAGE, 2000), she received the Central States Communication Association’s Theory Book Award in 2002. She also earned the W. Charles Redding Dissertation from the International Communication Association in 1988, and received some top paper awards. In addition to editing Management Communication Quarterly, she has served as chairperson of the Organizational Communication Division of ICA, secretary of the Organizational Communication Division of the National Communication Association, as President of the Organization for the Study of Communication, Language and Gender, and as a current editorial board member for eight journals and a handbook. For this and other work, she was awarded the Outstanding Member Award from her ICA division and the Alumnus of the Year Award from the School of Interpersonal Communication at Ohio University.