Rethinking the Constitution: Perspectives on Canadian Constitutional Reform, Interpretation, and Theory

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Anthony Arthur Peacock
Oxford University Press, 1996 - Political Science - 286 pages
The Charter of Rights and Freedoms has had far-reaching consequences for Canadian law, politics, and society. In fact, the problems that plagued constitutional reform in the late 1980s and early 1990s and that resulted in the demise of the Charlottetown Accord as well as of the federal Progressive Conservative Party seem to have been closely related to the politics of judicial review under the Charter. Was there a common thread linking the problems of Canadian constitutional reform,interpretation and theory? The contributors to this book believe that there was, and the thirteen essays contained in this book attempt to rethink these themes from the point of view of Canadian liberal constitutionalism. These rigorously argued essays combine legal, political, historical, and philosophical analysis with critiques of the Supreme Court's Charter decisions, the preoccupation with 'rights talk' in Canadian politics and society at large, and other recent developments in constitutional law and politics.

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Contents

ROBERT MARTIN
3
H D FORBES
17
CHRISTOPHER P MANFREDI
40
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

Anthony A. Peacock is a member of the Bar of Ontario. After articling and practicing litigation for five years in Toronto, he moved to the Los Angeles area, where he government at Claremont McKenna College.

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